Draft Black Country Plan

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1 Sub-Areas and Site Allocations

A. Dudley

Introduction

A1 Dudley has a rich cultural and industrial heritage and is often referred to as the historic capital of the Black Country, a name derived from its industrial past of coal mines and blast furnaces used for iron and steelmaking.

A2 Whilst once a key industrial town, a range of high quality and varied attractions now contribute to its historic landscape and heritage value, including: Dudley Castle, which dates back to the 11th Century; the internationally renowned Zoological Gardens; the open-air Black Country Living Museum; and Dudley Canal Trust, which has a sixteen-mile canal network. The tourism sector in Dudley makes a significant economic impact to the borough and the wider sub-region, supporting 10,575 jobs and generating some £405 million in the local economy[1].

A3 The borough is predominantly urban in character, but also contains extensive green space, natural assets and nature reserves. The southern and western fringes of the borough form part of the West Midlands Green Belt, which also extends into the urban area as a series of green 'corridors'. Some 18% of the land in the borough is designated as green belt; with a further 14% being public green space. The borough is home to one Special Area of Conservation (SAC), ten Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs), two National Nature Reserves and seven Local Nature Reserves. Dudley, along with the other districts of the Black Country, achieved UNESCO Global Geopark status in July 2020.

A4 Dudley has a growing and diverse population of over 320,000 residents, the second largest population across the BCA, of which 19.4% are young people; 60.2% are working age and 20.4% are aged 65 and above. There is an equal mix of male and females and in 2016 it was estimated that 12.6% of residents were from Black and Minority Ethnic groups[2]. At 72%, the borough's employment rate is higher than the average of 68.3% across the Black Country.

A5 Dudley was once a key industrial town generating wealth from coal and limestone mining, glass, iron and steel production. Despite a decline in activity since the 1970s, the area has retained manufacturing as a core industry, and today the sector employs 18,000 people in Dudley and contributes 15% of the local economy's GVA. The service sector in Dudley accounts for almost 80% of total employment with Public Administration, Education and the Health sector accounting for the highest proportion of employment.

A6 The Covid-19 pandemic had an immediate and significant impact on the UK economy in 2020, with a particular effect on the retail, tourism and hospitality sectors, as well as the manufacturing and construction sectors. Given the predominance of these sectors in Dudley, the pandemic has had a disproportionate adverse impact on the borough. Dudley Council has pro-actively responded to the challenges presented by Covid-19 and is shaping interventions across the borough to address the impact of the pandemic.
 

The Strategy

A7 Notwithstanding the key issues outlined above, Dudley Council is continuing to provide a framework which includes placemaking as a tool in order to support, promote and delivereconomic and social regeneration, with significant public and private sector investment planned across the borough. In addition to recent investment, the area has the following key strengths to build on:

  • People and communities – diverse, healthy and safe communities; thriving community and voluntary sector; and strong civic pride and community resilience;
  • Place – world renowned cultural and heritage assets; strategic transport investments; a growing learning quarter; excellent digital connectivity and commitment to a sustainable environment;
  • Business – sectoral strengths (health, retail, manufacturing, education); Dudley Enterprise Zone; Dudley Business First.
     

Dudley Borough's Vision

A8 'Forging a future for all' is a shared vision for Dudley borough, developed in 2018, following extensive consultation with key partners and stakeholders. It is built around seven aspirations and goals to be reached by 2030:

  • Towns – Dudley will have thriving, regenerated town centres where people are proud, work, shop and spend leisure time;
  • Education – outstanding local schools, colleges and universities which secure excellent results for their learners;
  • Business – a portfolio of quality industrial, retail and commercial premises;
  • Tourism – an attractive tourism offer with a rich industrial, historical and geological focus
  • Transport- improved public transport system linking Dudley borough to other Black Country strategic centres, the wider region and the national rail network;
  • Environment – Dudley will be an affordable and attractive place to live, with a green network of high-quality parks, waterways and nature reserves that are valued by local people and visitors. There will be a strong affinity to local centres, supporting health, wellbeing and prosperity; and
  • Community – Dudley will be a place with healthy, resilient, safe communities with high aspirations and the ability to shape their own future. Dudley will have improved health outcomes and higher wellbeing.

A9 The BCP forms an essential part of this strategy, supporting the recovery and growth of the economy, and providing for a continuous supply of new homes to meet the needs of local communities. The BCP will ensure that the borough's network of open spaces will be protected and enhanced to support its natural assets and can continue to provide opportunities to improve health and well-being whilst ensuring that development is located where it can provide convenient access for all sections of the community to work, shopping, health, education, leisure, green space and other facilities.

A10 The BCP supports the delivery of 13,235 new homes and 22ha employment land to 2039, supporting the growth of the borough's population to around 350,000 people by 2040. To plan for this growth, Dudley is prioritising locations that are both sustainable and deliverable in line with the Spatial Strategy set out in Policy CSP1. This growth will be supported by transport investment, focused on the rapid transit network and key road corridors as well as investment in walking and cycling.

 

Figure 15 - Dudley Spatial Plan

Figure 15 - Dudley Spatial Plan

 

A11 Development and investment will be focussed on Brierley Hill Strategic Centre and three Core Regeneration Areas as summarised in Table 13 below.
 

Table 13 - Dudley Growth Targets (2020 - 2039)
Location Housing (dwellings)  Employment land hectares (ha) 
Strategic Centre 
Brierley Hill (Strategic Centre) 3,154 (inc 350 uplift)  0
Core Regeneration Areas 
Central Core Regeneration Area 1,712  7.51
North West Core Regeneration Area 1,145  1.4 
Jewellery Line Core Regeneration Area 886
Total Growth Network     6,897     8.91
Towns and Neighbourhoods Area
Dudley Towns and Neighbourhood Areas  2,662 13.09
Kingswinford Neighbourhood Growth Area  860 0
Total Towns and Neighbourhoods Area 3,522  13.09
Allowance for windfall housing sites (outside of the strategic centre)  2,816    
Total 13,235      22

 

 

Brierley Hill Strategic Centre

A12 Brierley Hill Strategic Centre, as designated on the Policies Map and shown in Figure 16, incorporates both the traditional High Street and the Merry Hill Centre. The traditional Brierley Hill High Street is a separate entity (i.e. excluding Merry Hill) and represents a retail area that serves its immediate hinterland and local community. The Merry Hill Centre is a key element of the Brierley Hill economic and physical landscape. It represents the single largest quantity of managed floorspace within the Black Country Local Authorities' (BCLA) area and is a regional centre of significance and ranks within the top 100 retail centres nationally (Experian). It has a wide catchment area that encompasses the Black Country and beyond.

A13 The BCP supports the diversification, repurposing and rejuvenation of the Strategic Centre. Changing shopping patterns and challenges to the high street will be addressed through increased flexibility and facilitating the consolidation of the shopping core (particularly to reduce vacancy rates), complemented by office and leisure-led mixed uses, and supported by maximising residential provision in all locations (including the use of upper floors). The future of the centre, as with most strategic centres across the Black Country, is dependent on ensuring less reliance on retail to generate footfall and to support alternative uses (potentially including mixed uses) that function both during the day and into the evening.

A14 The Brierley Hill Town Centre Investment Programme, supported by £10 million funding from the Government's Future High Street Fund, will deliver environmental improvements and improved pedestrian access to the High Street/Metro and Merry Hill. There is significant potential to redevelop vacant properties for office and new residential uses, alongside estate renewal opportunities. In addition, Dudley Council secured a further £1.8m of funding for the Brierley Hill High Street Heritage Action Zone (HAZ). It is a Government funded and run by Historic England with the aim of making the high street a more attractive, engaging and vibrant place for people to live, work and spend time. Brierley Hill High Street was one of 68 High Street across England selected to receive a share of the fund. The character and quality of both the cultural and civic function of the strategic centre and the built and natural environment will be improved, helping to make it a sustainable, healthy and attractive place to shop, live, work and visit. This will be achieved through BCP Policies (particularly CSP2, CEN2 and Environmental Transformation Policies).

Figure 16 - Brierley Hill Strategic Centre

Figure 16 - Brierley Hill Strategic Centre

 

A15 The Black Country Centres Study advises that the future prosperity of the Brierley Hill Strategic Centre is predicated on the need to reduce its reliance on the retail sector and instead seek alternative mixed uses that generate a daytime and evening economy.

A16 The key opportunities for Brierley Hill Strategic Centre are:

a) The diversification of uses within the centre, including the potential for a growth in leisure, restaurants and pubs, education and community facilities provision.
b) The identification of sites for a significant increase in new housing.
c) The programmed Midland Metro route, which runs through the centre with several stops proposed, including a potential interchange at Canal Street, including integrating stations within a network of pathways and cycleways.
d) The challenge of climate change and adapting to a low carbon future, including the further greening of the centre and the provision of renewable energy initiatives, including the provision of EV charging points.
e) Raising the profile of the High Street and capitalising on the successful Future High Streets (FHS) and Heritage Action Zone (HAZ) funding bids.
f) The Enterprise Zone (DY5 EZ), including the new university music faculty at The Waterfront.
g) The retention of The Waterfront primarily as an office centre.
h) The creation of high-quality public realm and more communal spaces and community focal points.
i) Improving the linkages between the Merry Hill Centre and Brierley Hill High Street, and the centre and the adjoining nature reserves.
j) Comprehensive 5G broadband coverage.

A17 Policy CSP2 sets the critical role of the four strategic centres as the key drivers to deliver the overall growth strategy. This is supplemented by Policy CEN2, which defines this role in more detail, providing specific guidance on the range of activities and scale of development that will be appropriate.

A18 The strategic centre benefits from an existing Area Action Plan (AAP) which was adopted in 2011. The AAP is currently the subject of a review and will be referred to as the Brierley Hill Plan (BHP). It is proposed that the BHP Issues and Options Report, which is due to be consulted upon after the consultation on the draft BCP, will present different options on the extent of the plan area and strategic centre boundaries. These will include an option that this boundary remains the same as those within the AAP. However, this may also mean that, subject to consultation on the BHP, the responses received and further assessment, the boundary of Brierley Hill Strategic Centre will change from that shown in Figure 16, and therefore be revised within later stages of the BCP.

A19 As stated above the AAP is currently subject to a review, with the review document (BHP) programmed for adoption shortly after the approval of the BCP. At this stage, the existing Brierley Hill AAP will be superseded (in total) by the new BHP, including the existing AAP land use allocations and policies.

A20 Therefore, for the purposes of applying Policies CEN1-6, within Brierley Hill Strategic Centre the following AAP policies are relevant in defining in-centre boundaries, but will be superseded post-BCP adoption within the BHP:

  • Retail – Primary Shopping Area (AAP Policies 45 and 46)
  • Office – AAP boundary (and AAP Policies 46 and 48)
  • Leisure - AAP boundary (and AAP Policy 46)

A21 The housing capacity for the strategic centre outlined in Table 13 is based on the existing AAP allocations and recent evidence including the Black Country Centre's study and the DY5 Enterprise Zone Review by Cushman Wakefield. It includes an estimated uplift as detailed in the Black Country Urban Capacity Review 2021. This capacity will be further tested through the AAP review but provides a sound basis to understand the housing capacity for the Strategic Centre for the purposes of this Plan.

A22 The Brierley Hill AAP also has the following targets for other land uses, carried through from the Black Country Core Strategy: -

  • Offices – an additional 220,000 sq. m (gross) of floorspace
  • Comparison Retail – an additional 95,000 sq. m (gross) of floorspace

A23 However, current evidence highlights future uncertainty and little capacity to support additional floorspace for these land uses. Subject to further assessment, monitoring and review, this evidence will inform the scope for future land use allocations within the BHP.
 

Central Core Regeneration Area

A24 The Central Core Regeneration Areais focussedon A461 Birmingham Road / Stourbridge Road and the Midland Metro Wednesbury to Brierley Hill extension. It is centred on the Wednesbury to Brierley Hill Growth Corridor, recognised as a priority for investment in the WMCA SIDP and the West Midlands Housing Deal.

A25 The areacontains the town centres of Dudley (which has a tourism focus of regional and national significance) and Stourbridge and runs adjacent to the Brierley Hill Strategic Centre.

A26 The area has major regeneration and renewal opportunities (inc. Netherton) for new employment and residential development, which will be well-connected by public transport via the new Dudley Interchange and the metro extension, to retail, office and leisure opportunities at Brierley Hill Strategic Centre and DY5 Enterprise Zone.

A27 The area is well connected to important road, canal and tram infrastructure, that link Dudley with the Black Country, the national rail network and the wider hinterland. Utilising the opportunities presented by the extended Metro line serving Wednesbury to Brierley Hill, proposals are being put forward to enhance rapid public transport connectivity along the Brierley Hill to Stourbridge corridor.

A28 In and around Dudley town centre a series of public sector-led interventions have been implemented since 2012 and as of 2021, a programme of further investment is on site or planned that will deliver the comprehensive regeneration of the area. This includes the Metro Extension; Dudley Transport Interchange; construction of the Very Light Rail National Innovation Centre (VLRNIC), the Black Country and Marches Institute of Technology and the extension of the Black Country Living Museum. There are further aspirations to deliver a new higher education facility, creating a University Centre and Learning Quarter at Castle Hill, that will stimulate the transformational change of the town centre.

A29 The Plan supports the role of the Central Core Regeneration Area as a major Growth Corridor and offers the opportunity to enhance the town centres of Dudley and Stourbridge and the corridor between them. The extension of the Metro through Dudley and Brierley Hill and the proposed further extension of a rapid transit system from Brierley Hill to Stourbridge, provide a game changing opportunity for the economic, social and environmental regeneration of the Borough. The location of housing and employment land opportunities along the route of the metro has the potential to facilitate significant housing and employment growth within the catchment of new stations.

A30 New development will respect and enhance the historic character and local distinctiveness of the area, with investment in environmental infrastructure including the canals, open spaces and wildlife habitats.
 

Jewellery Line Core Regeneration Area

A31 The Jewellery Line Core Regeneration Area is focused on Lye whichhas been identified as a key housing-led regeneration area within the Dudley Borough Development Strategy[3]. In the region of 880 homes have been identified for development primarily on obsolete employment sites adjacent to the district centre, Lye Station and along the river Stour corridor.

A32 Opportunities exist to consolidate the area as a location for housing growth through the development of outdated or obsolete areas of industrial land and the exploitation of the excellent main-line rail links. Lye is well-connected to key road and rail networks. Lye Station lies on the Birmingham-Worcester railway line (Jewellery Line), with central Birmingham and future links to HS2 just 25 minutes away. The Wednesbury to Brierley Hill Metro extension, to be completed in 2022, will improve connectivity between Lye and employment opportunities at Brierley Hill, Dudley and the wider sub-region.

A33 Lye has been promoted as one of the Black Country Garden City locations[4] by the Black Country LEP. The original Garden City movement focused on improving quality of life and society living and functioning within the natural environment.

A34 The Plan will support the comprehensive development of Lye and its surrounding area as an Urban Garden City, creating an enhanced sense of place by seeking to improve its housing offer, realise the economic potential of the area, enhance the District Centre and local community facilities, whilst at the same time enhancing the Stour Valley and protecting the area's environment and nature conservation value.
 

North West Core Regeneration Area

A35 The North West Core Regeneration Area is focussed on the area of Pensnett. The area is served by Pensnett Trading Estate, one of the largest secure business estates in Europe, and home to 160 businesses, as well as adjacent industrial areas, providing a major employment location for the borough.

The Plan identifies opportunities for new residential communities, including the former Ketley Quarry site (strategic allocation DSA3), providing additional high-quality housing. New housing development will provide additional catchment for Kingswinford District Centre and for Pensnett and Wall Health local centres, helping to sustain their resilience and vitality as local centres. The BCP promotes enhanced connectivity to local facilities via more sustainable transport links (public transport, walking and cycling) and enhanced environmental improvements. Development will protect and enhance the area's wildlife corridor, which runs between the green belt from South Staffordshire into the urban areas of Brierley Hill, Pensnett and Dudley. There are also important ecological links to Fens Pools Local Nature Reserve and its Special Area of Conservation. Opportunities to contribute to the Wildlife Corridor between Fens Pools SAC and Baggeridge Country Park should be explored as part of future developments in the area.
 

Dudley Towns and Neighbourhoods Area

A36 The Plan includes existing Towns and Neighbourhood Areas such as Halesowen, Sedgley, Coseley and Stourbridge. These areas are established residential and employment areas served by a network of district and local centres as defined in Policy CEN1 and CEN5, as well as providing local employment opportunities and community facilities to serve communities outside the strategic centre and Core Regeneration Areas. The BCP seeks to sustain and enhance these areas by ensuring a mix of good quality residential areas through a constant supply of small-scale development opportunities and potential renewal.

A37 The Towns and Neighbourhoods Area also includes a new Neighbourhood Growth Area in Kingswinford where two sites, Land south of Holbeache Lane / Wolverhampton Road in Kingswinford and Land at Swindon Road in Wall Heath, will be released from the green belt. This will be covered by a Strategic Allocation and will be the focus of new residential growth. There will be a requirement for development proposed on allocated sites to be of the highest quality and accommodate the correct infrastructure provision in the right places. Housing growth in this part of the borough will be supported by a strengthened local infrastructure, including local highway improvements, and creation of new green spaces of value for residents and wildlife. New housing development will provide additional catchment for Kingswinford District Centre and Wall Health local centres, helping to sustain their resilience and vitality as local centres. These requirements will be addressed through the production of master plans for the sites in accordance with Policy CPS3 and policies DSA1 and DSA2 below.
 

Green Belt Areas

A38 The green belt areas of Dudley form a series of wedges and urban fringe areas and perform many different functions. The green belt areas do contain some rural landscapes, including agricultural land such as around Halesowen and Stourbridge. However, much of the green belt is captured within the urban area and provides a network of natural and formal open spaces, historic parks, such as Leasowes, education buildings, recreational facilities (such as Stourbridge and Halesowen golf courses), and other infrastructure (such as sewage works, sub-stations and cemeteries). Fens Pools SAC forms an important wedge of the green belt in the heart of borough's urban area. Opportunities to contribute to the wildlife corridor between Fens Pools SAC and Baggeridge Country Park is a priority for improvement and extension.
 

Delivering the Strategy

A39 This strategy will be delivered by:

a) A review of the adopted Brierley Hill Area Action Plan (AAP), to be known as the Brierley Hill Plan to refresh detailed site allocations within the strategic centre boundary in a comprehensive manner, in accordance with the Vision and strategic priorities set out in Policy CSP2.
b) The allocation of sites and implementation of policies in this Plan across the administrative area to accommodate housing and employment development.
c) The saving of policies contained in the Dudley Borough Development Strategy and the Dudley, Halesowen and Stourbridge Area Action Plans (AAP) unless specifically replaced by Policies in the Black Country Plan as listed in Appendix A1.

A40 A number of the Development Allocations replace existing allocations made in adopted Local Plan documents, which formed part of the Dudley Policies Map. Where this is the case, the previous allocation reference and the Local Plan document concerned are listed in Appendix A1. Appendix A2 provides details of all other Local Plan designations in Dudley that have also been replaced or amended through this Plan. Such changes have only been made where this is necessary to deliver development allocations.

A41 Where town centre policies contain a housing element which have counted towards Dudley's housing provision, but do not form part of the Black Country Plan allocations, these have been listed in Appendix A3.

A42 Detailed site and designation boundaries can be viewed on the online Policies Map for Dudley.
 

Development Allocations

A43 Outside the strategic centre, Table 14 provides details of all development allocations made through this Plan within Dudley. A number of these allocations are of strategic significance to the delivery of the Plan because of their size, either individually or in combination with adjoining allocations. Each strategic allocation has a separate policy, providing details of the specific constraints and requirements affecting development, which should be read alongside the information for the allocation provided in Table 14.

 

Table 14 - Dudley Housing Allocations in the Black Country Plan (BCP Policy HOU1)

BCP Site Ref

Previous local plan allocation (replaced unless stated)

Site name and address

Appropriate uses

Indicative development capacity (net new homes)

Gross Site Area (ha)

Site area (ha) net

Brownfield/ greenfield

Anticipated delivery timescale

Further information

DUH208

Not previously allocated

Land south of Holbeache Lane / Wolverhampton Road, Kingswinford

housing

330 (40 DPH)

14.8

8.24

greenfield

2030 - 2035

155 homes

2035 – 2039

175 homes

Site removed from green belt. See Strategic Allocation Policy DSA1 for further details

DUH211

Not previously allocated

Land at Swindon Road, Wall Heath, Kingswinford (The Triangle Site)

housing

533 (40 DPH)

26

13.30

greenfield

2030 - 2035 280 homes

2035 - 2039 253 homes

Site removed from green belt. See Strategic Allocation Policy DSA2 for further details.

DUH218

Not previously allocated

Lower Guys Lane, Lower Gornal

housing

25 (35 DPH)

1.0

0.75

greenfield

2030 - 2035 25 homes

Site removed from green belt. See Policy CSP3 for further details.

DUH203

Not previously allocated

Ketley Quarry / Ketley Farm, Dudley Road, Kingswinford

housing

612 (40/45dph)

20.81

13.52

brownfield

2024 – 2029 50 homes

2030 - 2035 250 homes

2035- 2039 312 homes

See Strategic Allocation Policy DSA3

DUH206

Not previously allocated

Worcester Lane North, Stourbridge

housing

10 (35 DPH)

0.61

0.61

greenfield

2024 - 2029

10 homes

Site removed from green belt. See Policy CSP3 for further details. SLINC mitigation required. Hedgerow to be protected.

Railway to be considered.

DUH207

Not previously allocated

Worcester Lane Central, Stourbridge

housing

45 (35 DPH)

2.29

1.37

greenfield

2024 - 2029

45 homes

Site removed from green belt. See Policy CSP3 for further details. SLINC mitigation required. Hedgerow to be protected.

Railway to be considered.

DUH209

Not previously allocated

Worcester Lane South, Stourbridge

housing

60 (35 DPH)

3.30

3.00

greenfield

2030-35

60 homes

Site removed from green belt. See Policy CSP3 for further details. SLINC mitigation required.

DUH217

Not previously allocated

Grazing Land Wollaston Farm, Wollaston, Stourbridge

housing

90 (35 DPH)

3.77

2.56

greenfield

2024-2029

20 homes

2030-35

70 homes

Site removed from green belt. See Policy CSP3 for further details. Access constraints to be considered.

DUH210

Not previously allocated

Viewfield Crescent, Dudley

housing

24 (30DPH)

1.56

0.83

greenfield

2024-2029

24 homes

Site removed from green belt. See Policy CSP3 for further details.

Rights of Way-Along southern Boundary

SLINC mitigation required. Steep incline on site.

DUH222

Not previously allocated

Corbyns Hall Open Space, Severn Drive, Pensnett

Housing

15 (15DPH)

1.01

1.01

Greenfield

2030-2035

15 homes

Access constraints on site

DUH223

DBDS E11B.6

Brockmoor Foundry North, Leys Road, Brockmoor, Brierley Hill

housing

60 (40DPH)

1.9

1.7

brownfield

2035-2039

60 homes

Noise constraints from adjacent industrial works.

DUH220

Not previously allocated

VB Old Wharf, Old Wharf Road, Stourbridge

Housing

36 (35DPH)

1.40

1.05

Brownfield

2035-2039

36 homes

Industrial area

DUH001

DBDS H11B.1

Cookley Works, Leys Road, Brockmoor, Brierley Hill

housing

70 (45DPH)

2.16

1.62

brownfield

2030 – 2035

70 homes

Access constraints on site.

DUH002

DBDS H11B.16

Land at Old Wharf Road, Stourbridge

housing

230 (55 DPH)

7.02

4.20

brownfield

2024-2029

80 homes

2030 – 2035

100 homes

2035-2039

50 homes

Majority of the site is cleared with main businesses relocated.

Net area to allow for supporting infrastructure and open space requirements.

DUH219

DBDS NETH.E1

Marriott Road, Netherton

housing

105 (40 DPH)

3.50

2.6

brownfield

2030-35

88 homes

2035-2039

17 homes

SLINC mitigation required. Area of high historic townscape value and archaeological priority area.

DUH003

DBDS H13.26

West of Engine Lane, north of the railway, Lye

housing

168 (40 DPH)

6.00

4.25

brownfield

2030- 2035

90 homes

2035-2039

78 homes

Sustainable location close to Lye train station – likely to come forward as part of the Lye regeneration project. Net area allows for open space.

DUH004

DBDS H13.29

Long Lane / Malt Mill Lane, Shell Corner

housing

13 (35 DPH)

0.36

0.36

brownfield

2024 – 2029

13 homes

Site adjoins an existing housing commitment.

DUH005

DBDS H13.4

Belmont Road, Lye

housing

12 (35 DPH)

0.33

0.33

brownfield

2024- 2029

12 homes

Back – land site to the rear of properties

DUH006

DBDS H13.5

Caledonia Sewage Works, Lye

housing

158 dwellings (35 DPH)

6.24

3.97

brownfield

2024- 2029

100 homes

2030-2035

58 homes

Net area reduced to allow for flood risk areas and SLINC mitigation required.

DUH007

DBDS H13.28

Clinic Drive, Lye

mixed use

10 (15 DPH)

0.91

0.68

brownfield

2024-2029

10 homes

Mixed use site for community uses or supermarket provision with peripheral housing.

DUH008

DBDS H13.10

116-120 Colley Gate, Cradley

housing

14 (60 DPH)

0.25

0.25

brownfield

2024 – 2029

14 homes

Within Cradley / Windmill Hill Local Centre

DUH009

DBDS H11B.7

Land off Delph Lane, Brierley Hill

housing

45 (35 DPH)

1.28

1.28

brownfield

2030 - 2035

45 homes

Vacant site in a residential area

DUH010

DBDS HO.10

Land off Ruiton Street / Colwall Road, Lower Gornal

housing

19 (40 DPH)

0.46

0.46

brownfield

2024-2029

19 homes

Vacant land allocated in a residential area

DUH058

DBDS NETH.H8

St Peter's Road, Netherton

housing

55 (50 DPH)

1.2

0.89

brownfield

2024-2029

55 homes

Industrial area adjacent to the canal.

DUH012

DBDS HO.12

Summit Place, Gornal Wood

housing

15 (35 DPH)

0.43

0.43

greenfield

2024-2029

15 homes

Land adjacent to PH in a residential area

DUH013

DBDS H16.11

Land adj. to 49 Highfields Road, Coseley

housing

13 (35 DPH)

0.40

0.40

brownfield

2024-2029

13 homes

Vacant land adjacent to residential premises.

DUH014

DBDS H13.21

Springfield Works, Pearson Street, Lye

housing

10 (40 DPH)

0.35

0.25

brownfield

2024-2029

10 homes

Locally listed building means conversion is preferable. Indicative yield provided - based on 40 DPH (edge of centre).

DUH015

DBDS H11B.24

Land at Plant Street, Mill Street and Bridge Street, Wordsley

housing

43 (45 DPH)

1.29

0.97

brownfield

2024-2029

43 homes

Industrial area with fragmented ownership. Site area and capacity has been reduced in line with owners' intentions. The site adjoins the canal conservation area and has historic buildings.

DUH016

DBDS H11B.18

Leys Road / Moor Street, Brierley Hill

housing

78 (40 DPH)

2.77

1.95

brownfield

2035 – 2039

78 homes

Industrial premises including a former garage site.

DUH017

DBDS H11B.22

Quantum Works, Enville Street, Stourbridge

housing

14 (40 DPH)

0.36

0.36

brownfield

2024-2029

14 homes

Narrow and restrictive site resulting in access constraints.

DUH018

DBDS H13.14

East of Balds Lane, Lye

housing

68 (35 DPH)

2.6

1.95

brownfield

2030 – 2035

68 homes

Underused industrial site. Current planning application on the site shows a willing landowner for redevelopment.

DUH019

DBDS H13.23

Rufford Road, Stourbridge

housing

16 (40 DPH)

0.41

0.41

brownfield

2024-2029

16 homes

Capacity and site area reduced in line with owner's intentions.

DUH020

DBDS H13.12

Lyde Green / Cradley Road, Cradley

housing

27 (40 DPH)

0.69

0.69

brownfield

2024-2029

27 homes

Capacity and site area reduced in line with owners' intentions and to allow for a buffer adjacent to the canal, in line with planning policy.

DUH021

DBDS NETH.H13

Land at corner of Saltwells Road and Halesowen Road, Netherton

housing

49 (35 DPH)

1.40

1.40

brownfield

2024-2029

49 homes

Industrial area adjacent to the canal. Land levels likely to reduce capacity.

DUH022

DBDS H13.17

Land off Thorns Road, Lye (North)

housing

105 (40 DPH)

3.42

2.61

brownfield

2024-2029

60 homes

2030-35

45 homes

Site area and capacity reduced in line with landowner consultation exercise.

DUH023

DBDS H13.16

Land off Engine Lane, (south of railway), Lye

housing

68 (40 DPH)

1.70

1.70

brownfield

2035 – 2039

68 homes

Sustainable location close to Lye Station. Other uses may be considered acceptable if there is a proven need for flexibility, subject to the proposed use being appropriate and non-conflicting with residential uses.

DUH024

DBDS H13.27

East of Engine Lane (south of the railway), Lye

housing

35 (35 DPH)

1.25

0.93

brownfield

2030 – 2035

35 homes

Sustainable location close to Lye Station. Other uses may be considered acceptable if there is a proven need for flexibility, subject to the proposed use being appropriate and non-conflicting with residential uses.

DUH025

DBDS H13.15

Bott Lane / Dudley Road, Lye

housing

43 (35 DPH)

1.25

1.25

brownfield

2035- 2039

43 homes

Sustainable location close to Lye Station. Other uses may be considered acceptable if there is a proven need for flexibility, subject to the proposed use being appropriate and non-conflicting with residential uses.

DUH027

DBDS H11A.21

280 Stourbridge Road (former Henry Boot training centre), Holly Hall, Dudley

housing

22 (80 DPH)

0.28

0.28

brownfield

2024 – 2029

22 homes

Adjacent site has outline planning permission for residential development.

DUH028

DBDS H11B.27

Land opposite Spicer Lodge, Enville Street, Stourbridge

housing

10 (40 DPH)

0.25

0.25

brownfield

2024 – 2029

10 homes

Yield based on an apartment scheme.

DUH029

DBDS H13.31

St Marks House, Brook Street, Lye

housing

12 (40 DPH)

0.29

0.29

brownfield

2024 – 2029

12 homes

Yield based on an apartment scheme.

DUH030

DBDS H11A.23

Shaw Road / New Road, Dudley

housing

16 (55 DPH)

0.39

0.29

brownfield

2024 - 2029

16 homes

Sustainable location. Original site boundary reduced following landowner engagement. Site is a difficult shape which will reduce capacity.

DUH031

DBDS NETH.H15

The Straits, Lower Gornal

housing

23 (35 DPH)

0.64

0.64

greenfield

2030 - 2035

23 homes

Green space on borough boundary.

DUH032

DBDS H11A.22

The Woodlands, Dixons Green Road

housing

22 (55 DPH)

0.40

0.40

brownfield

2024-2029

22 homes

Site of demolished care home.

DUH034

DBDS NETH.E1

Industrial land at Marriott Road and Cradley Road

housing

88 (35 DPH)

3.34

2.5

brownfield

2030-2035

88 homes

Industrial area within local employment area.

DUH035

DBDS E13.6

Hays Lane, Stour Vale Road, Lye

housing

58 (50DPH)

1.45

1.09

brownfield

2035 – 2039

58 homes

AHHTV area and heritage asset on site for conversion potential. Any proposed development will needs to meet requirement of Policies DEL2 / EMP4 and has potential contamination on site.

DUH036

DBDS E13.2

Leona Industrial Estate, Nimmings Road, Blackheath

housing

21 (40 DPH)

0.53

0.53

brownfield

2030-2035

21 homes

Subject to DEL 2 / EMP 4.

DUH044

DBDS H13.12

Land adj. rear 84-86 Lyde Green, Halesowen

housing

17 (35 DPH)

0.50

0.50

brownfield

2030 – 2035

17 homes

Mixed use scheme to allow for ground floor retail units.

DUH045

DBDS H13.13

Former factory site, Park Lane, Cradley

housing

80 (40 DPH)

3.6

2.00

brownfield

2024 - 2029

80 homes

Subject to a planning application currently being assessed – residential development.

DUH046

DBDS H14.4

Former MEB Headquarters, Mucklow Hill Halesowen

housing

60 (40 DPH)

1.50

1.50

brownfield

2030-2035

60 homes

Mixed use development opportunity.

DUH049

DBDS H16.2

Former Mons Hill Campus (Dudley College), Wrens Hill Road, Dudley

housing

30 (50 DPH)

0.81

0.60

brownfield

2024-2029

30 homes

Site is being progressed through pre-application discussions - adjacent residential development.

DUH053

DBDS ES13.3

Timmis Road, Lye

housing

17 (40 DPH)

0.6

0.45

brownfield

2024-2029

17 homes

Planning application on site.

DUH051

DBDS E11B.5

Northmoor Estate, Brierley Hill

housing

22 (50 DPH)

0.53

0.4

brownfield

2024-2029

22 homes

 

DUH057

DBDS H16.9

Land adjacent to Pear Tree Lane, Coseley

housing

38 (50 DPH)

0.99

0.74

greenfield

2024-2029

38 homes

 

DUH060

DBDS H13.22

Foredraft Street, Cradley (two sites, A and B)

housing

18 (35 DPH)

0.53

0.53

brownfield

2024-2029

18 homes

Site is subject to a live planning application.

DUH059

DBDS H14.3

Former New Hawne Colliery, Hayseech Road, Halesowen

housing

15 (30 DPH)

0.63

0.63

brownfield

2024-2029

15 homes

Grade II and Grade II* listed buildings on site, therefore sympathetic conversion is required, and any proposals need to be sympathetic to the setting of the designated heritage assets and to the AHHLV and APA

DUH033

DBDS H11B.26

Former Hospital Site, Ridge Hill, Brierley Hill Road, Wordsley

housing

103

3.5

3.5

brownfield

2024-2029

103 homes

Reserved matters approved for 103 units (P19/1777)

DUH061

DBDS H10.4

Former Ibstock Works Brick Ltd. Stallings Lane, Kingswindford

housing

148 (40 DPH)

7.58

4.5

brownfield

2024-2029

148 homes

Outline planning permission P16/1461 P20/0631 – reserved matters for 148 units, currently being assessed.

DUH011

DBDS H0.17

Bourne Street, Coseley

housing

79 (30DPH)

2.8

2.57

brownfield

2024-2029

79 homes

Former refuse tip. Will require remediation. Outline permission for up to 100 homes (P17/0184). Current application for 79 homes (P20/1306)

DUH026

DBDS H11A.19

Land at Bull Street, Dudley

housing

80 (40DPH)

2.06

2.06

brownfield

2024-2029

80 homes

Reserved matters for 80 units approved in October 2020 (P20/0647).

DUH063

SAAP S9

Bradley Road West, Stourbridge

housing

80 (45 DPH)

0.25

0.25

brownfield

2024-2029

80 homes

Housing site in the Stourbridge AAP

DUH062

DBDS H16.1

Land at Birmingham New Road, Coseley

housing

472

13.4

 

brownfield

2024-2029

472 homes

Reserved matters for 472 units (P19/0611). Site area reduced from previous allocation. Part of the site re-allocated to employment use.

DUH066

Not previously allocated

Sandvik Ltd, Manor Way, Halesowen

housing

60 (40 DPH)

1.5

1.5

brownfield

2024-2029

60 homes

Mixed use development opportunity.

DUH205

Not previously allocated

National Works, Hall Street, Dudley

housing

150 (55 DPH)

5.0

2.9

brownfield

2035-2039

150 homes

The site occupies an elevated location with respect to surrounding land uses to the north, east and south. The layout / density design will need to prevent overlooking. Tree retention is a possibility in the south east section of the site adjacent to Bean Road.

The whole site is within an Area of High Historic Townscape Value - Kates Hill and Dixons Green Road; mixed historic housing and industry

DUH050

Not previously allocated

Car park, Oak Court, Dudley

housing

24

0.37

0.37

brownfield

2024-2029

24 homes

 

DUH039

Not previously allocated

Land rear of Salcombe Grove, Coseley

housing

44

1.1

0.80

greenfield

2024-2029

44 homes

 

DUH054

Not previously allocated

Garage site adjacent Hinbrook Road, Dudley

housing

14

0.29

0.29

brownfield

2024-2029

14 homes

Garage site in centre of residential estate.

DUH052

Not previously allocated

Land rear of 294 - 364 Stourbridge Road, Halesowen

housing

39 (40 DPH)

1.34

1.0

brownfield

2024-2029

39 homes

Narrow access and substantial tree coverage on site.

DUH055

Not previously allocated

Land at Anchor Hill, Delph Road, Brierley Hill

housing

28 (40 DPH)

0.88

0.66

brownfield

2024-2029

28 homes

Site is being progressed through pre-application discussions.

DUH056

Not previously allocated

Land at Corporation Road and Cavell Road, Dudley

housing

20 (50 DPH)

0.42

0.42

brownfield

2024-2029

20 homes

Site is being progressed through pre-application discussions.

DUH038

Not previously allocated

Land between Heath Road and Copse Road, Netherton

housing

27 (40 DPH)

0.76

0.57

brownfield

2024 – 2029 27 homes

Open space

DUH040

Not previously allocated

High Street, Wollaston, Stourbridge

housing

14 (45 DPH)

0.40

0.30

brownfield

2024-2029

14 homes

Non-conforming use adjacent to the river.

DUH041

Not previously allocated

Land rear of Two Gates Lane, Cradley

housing

24 (45 DPH)

0.68

0.51

greenfield

2024-2029

24 homes

 

DUH042

Not previously allocated

Woodman Inn, 31 Leys Road, Brockmoor

housing

12 (40 DPH)

0.26

0.26

brownfield

2024-2029

12 homes

Former public house with residential to the south and Cookley Wharf industrial estate to the north.

DUH047

Not previously allocated

Land adjacent 32 Whitegates Road, Coseley

housing

10 (40 DPH)

0.25

0.25

brownfield

2024-2029

10 homes

Site is being progressed through pre-application discussions.

DUH037

Not previously allocated

206 Thorns Road, Quarry Bank

housing

26 (50 DPH)

0.55

0.47

brownfield

2024 – 2029

26 homes

Potential access constraints.

DUH048

Not previously allocated

Hampshire House, 434 High Street, Kingswinford

housing

30 (70 DPH)

0.44

0.44

brownfield

2024-2029

30 homes

Office building and associated parking, close to Kingswinford local centre.

DUH212

Not previously allocated

Lewis Rd, Lye

housing

38 (45 DPH)

4.14

1.4

greenfield

2024-29

38 homes

Tree mitigation works. Mitigation for loss of public open space. Land remediation works following landfill and mining works.

DUH204

Not previously allocated

Wellington Road and Dock Lane, Dudley

housing

88 (45 DPH)

2.2

1.65

brownfield

2030- 2035

88 homes

14 homes – density uplift

Edge of centre location, net area reduced to allow for supporting infrastructure and open space requirements.

DUH213

Not previously allocated

Lapwood Avenue, Kingswinford

housing

45 (40 DPH)

1.38

1.38

greenfield

2030 - 2035

45 homes

 

DUH214

Not previously allocated

Seymour Road, Wollescote

housing

4 (40DPH)

0.19

0.15

greenfield

2024-2029

4 homes

Site has steep topography.

DUH215

Not previously allocated

Bent Street,

Brierley Hill

housing

7 (40 DPH)

0.15

0.15

greenfield

2024-2029

7 homes

 

DUH216

Not previously allocated

Bryce Road, Pensnett

housing

115 (40 DPH)

4.0

3.0

greenfield

2024- 2029

55 homes

2030 – 2035 60 homes

Residential bounding all sides of the site. Former primary school now demolished to the north east. Allow for 25% open space and infrastructure.

DUH221

Not previously allocated

Standhills Road, Kingswinford South

housing

52 (35DPH)

3.93

1.57

brownfield

2035 – 2039

52 homes

To be included in Masterplan of Ketley Quarry (inc site access). Protected trees and SLINC mitigation required.

DUH042

Not previously allocated

Land at Blowers Green Road, Dudley

housing

75 (45 DPH)

1.88

1.41

brownfield

2024 – 2029

75 homes

12 homes – density uplift

Housing redevelopment would remove non-conforming use.

DUH043

Not previously allocated

Woodman Inn

housing

12 (46 DPH)

0.26

0.26

brownfield

   

DUH065

 

Church Road, Netherton

housing

29

0.88

0.66

brownfield

2024 – 2029 29 homes

Housing renewal site

DUH064

 

Baptist Road, Netherton (Former Arley Court and Compton Court)

housing

49

1.45

1.09

brownfield

2024 – 2029 49 homes

Housing renewal site

 

 

Table 15 - Dudley Gypsy and Traveller Pitch Carried Forward Allocations in Black Country Plan (BCP Policy HOU1 / HOU4)

BCP Site Ref

Previous local plan allocation (replaced unless stated)

Site name and address

Appropriate uses

Indicative development capacity (net homes)

Gross site area (ha) (brownfield /greenfield)

Indicative net developable area (ha)

Net density (dph)

Anticipated delivery timescale

Further information

DUGT01

DBDS – L5

Delph Lane, Brierley Hill

Gypsy and Traveller Pitches

4 pitches

0.12

0.12

N/A

Existing allocation

Established in 1965 and allocated in local plan in 2016. Potential further capacity for an additional two pitches

DUGT02

DBDS – L5

Holbeache Lane, Wall Heath

Gypsy and Traveller Pitches

4 pitches

0.24

0.24

N/A

Existing allocation

Established since 1960 without formal planning permission. Site allocated in Dudley Borough Development Strategy to regularise the site in planning policy. Potential further capacity for an additional 4 pitches

DUGT03

DBDS – L5

Dudley Road, Lye

Gypsy and Traveller Pitches

6 pitches

0.3

0.3

N/A

Existing allocation

Established in 1953 and allocated in local plan in 2016

DUGT04

DBDS – L5

Smithy Lane, Pensnett

Gypsy and Traveller Pitches

15 pitches

0.45

0.45

N/A

Existing allocation

Established in 1984 allocated in local plan in 2016

DUGT05

DBDS – L5

Oak Lane, Pensnett

Gypsy and Traveller Pitches

22 pitches

1.1

1.1

N/A

Existing allocation

Allocated in Local Plan since 1993. Site established in 1974

DUGT10

Not previously allocated

Saltbrook Scrapyard, Salbrook Road, Halesowen

Gypsy and Traveller Pitches

2 pitches

2.92

2.19

N/A

Existing

Site secured planning permission in 2019 and was implemented in 2020. Site allocated in BCP

 

 

Table 16 - Dudley Employment Allocations in Black Country Plan (BCP Policy EMP1)

BCP Site Ref

Previous local plan allocation (replaced unless stated) or other source

Site name and address

Appropriate uses

Indicative development capacity (employment land floorspace sqm)

Gross site area (ha)

Anticipated delivery timescale

Further information

DUE323

DBDS E16.2

Fountain Lane / Budden Road, Coseley

Mixed Employment Uses B2/B8/E(g)

5,000

1.79

Post 2026

Land adjoining existing industrial unit within Local Employment Area.

DUE326

DBDS E10.2

Gibbons Industrial Park / United Steels, Pensnett

Mixed Employment Uses B2/B8/E(g)

4,500

0.74

2021-26

Vacant land adjoining steelworks within Local Employment Area.

DUE123

DBDS ES10.1

Dandy Bank Road Phases 2 and 3, Pensnett

Mixed Employment Uses B2/B8/E(g)

5,869

4.27

2021-26

Within DY5 EZ

Extension to Pensnett Trading Estate Strategic Employment Area, granted planning permission for three industrial units in 2020 (P19/1532).

DUE327

DBDS ES10.1/E10.1

Tansey Green Road, Pensnett

Mixed Employment Uses B2/B8/E(g)

7,000

2.33

2021-26

Within DY5 EZ

Land around existing brickworks - possible former surface working of clay and marl and tipping of waste material.

DUE320

DBDS E10.1

Dreadnought Road, Pensnett

Mixed Employment Uses B2/B8/E(g)

3,716

0.99

2021-26

Within DY5 EZ

Part of area around existing brickworks Planning permission granted for industrial unit (mixed employment uses) in 2019 (P19/0942)

DUE132

DBDS ES11A.3

Hulbert Drive, Blackbrook Valley

Mixed Employment Uses B2/B8/E(g)

8,440

2.04

2021-26

Within DY5 EZ Planning applications for industrial employment uses recently submitted (P20/1527 and P20/1565)

DUE136

DBDS ES11A.4

Narrowboat Way, Blackbrook Valley

Mixed Employment Uses B2/B8/E(g)

5,000

1.48

Post 2026

Within DY5 EZ

Adverse ground conditions are required to be remediated

DUE137

DBDS ES11A.7

Brewins Way, Blackbrook Valley

Mixed Employment Uses B2/B8/E(g)

1,850

0.75

2021-26

Within DY5 EZ. Planning Permission granted for the erection of an industrial unit to house a metal recycling operation (P19/1426).

DUE147

DBDS NETH.ES9

Cradley Road, Westminster Industrial Estate, Netherton

Mixed Employment Uses B2/B8/E(g)

1,600

0.48

2021-26

Existing industrial units on 2/3 sides.

DUE149

DBDS ES11B.2

Moor Street, Brierley Hill

Mixed Employment Uses B2/B8/E(g)

9,000

2.17

Post 2026

Land alongside and including redundant freight line (former depot).

DUE187

DBDS ES14.3

Steelpark Road, Halesowen

Mixed Employment Uses B2/B8/E(g)

2,700

0.40

2021-26

Existing industrial units on 4 sides.

DUE198

DBDS ES13.1

Cakemore Road, Blackheath

Mixed Employment Uses B2/B8/E(g)

5,234

1.18

2021-26

Reserved Matters approved for mixed industrial use - P20/0348

DUE322

DBDS E11A.1

Grazebrook Park, Blackbrook Valley,

Mixed Employment Uses B2/B8/E(g)

1,704

0.47

2021-26

Within DY5 EZ Recent planning application for industrial employment uses submitted – P20/1528

DUE321

DBDS H16.1

Bean Road, Coseley

Mixed Employment Uses B2/B8/E(g)

4,000

2.16

Post 2026

Adverse ground conditions to be remediated. Whole site previously allocated for housing. Site area now amended to include employment land allocation on part of site.

DUE135

DBDS ES11A.8

New Road, Netherton

Mixed Employment Uses B2/B8/E(g)

2,800

0.75

2021-26

Within DY5 EZ and adjacent to existing industrial units

 

Waste Allocations

Strategic Waste Management Sites

A44 The existing strategic sites identified on the Waste Key Diagram are the significant waste management facilities operating in the Black Country. They have been identified through a detailed analysis of all known licenced and exempt facilities in each authority area. Under Policy W2 (Waste Sites), the BCA will safeguard all existing strategic and other waste management facilities from inappropriate development, in order to maintain existing levels of waste management capacity and meet Strategic Priority 13, "To manage waste as a resource and minimise the amount produced and sent to landfill".

A45 The strategic waste management sites within Dudley Borough are listed in Table 17:
 

Table 17 - Strategic Waste Management Sites in Dudley (BCP Policy W2

BCP Site Ref/location

Previous Local Plan Ref (2011 Black Country Core Strategy, BCCS)

Site Name and Address

Operational capacity (tonnes per annum, tpa)

Total Landfill Capacity (tonnes) (end of 2018)

Municipal Waste Recovery Installations

WS01

WSD6

Dudley Energy from Waste (EfW) facility, Lister Road Depot, Lister Road, Dudley

95,000

Municipal Waste Recovery – supporting infrastructure

WS04

WSD11

(see DBDS page 20)

Blowers Green Recycling Depot, Blowers Green Road, Dudley

40,000

WS05

n/a

Lister Road Transfer Station, Lister Road Depot, Lister Road, Dudley

23,500

WS06

WSD10

Stourbridge Household Waste Recycling Centre (HWRC) off Birmingham Street (A458), Stourbridge

20,000

Waste Disposal Installations

WS16

WSD5

Himley Quarry Landfill, Oak Lane, Kingswinford

150,000 / 432,000

Significant Metal Recycling Sites (MRS)

WS21

WSD9

Shakespeare's MRS, Oak Lane, Kingswinford

40,000

WS22

WSD1

Sims MRS Halesowen, James Scott Road, Cradley, Halesowen

(formerly E Coley Steel)

35,000

WS23

n/a

Wades of Wednesbury, Webb Street, Coseley

20,000

Other Significant Waste Management Infrastructure

WS34

n/a

AB Waste Management and Skip Hire (formerly Bloomfield Recycling)

45,000

WS35

n/a

Green World Recycling, Hayes Trading Estate, Folkes Road, Lye

50,000

 

Preferred Areas for New Waste Facilities

A46 A number of employment areas have been identified in the Black Country Waste Study (BCWS) as being most suited to the development of new waste recovery, waste treatment and waste transfer infrastructure.

A47 Under Policy W3 (Preferred Areas for New Waste Facilities), these areas are considered least likely to give rise to land use conflicts, and in several cases, there is already co-location of existing waste facilities to which new sites would contribute.

A48 There is only one such area in Dudley Borough, and this is identified on the Waste Key Diagram and listed in Table 18:

Table 18 - Preferred areas for new waste facilities in Dudley (BCP Policy W3)

Area Ref

Previous Local Plan Ref (2017 Dudley Borough Development Strategy, DBDS)

Address

Area (hectares)

WPD1

E16.2 (local employment area)

Bloomfield Road / Budden Road, Coseley (note that parts of this area extend into Sandwell Borough)

28.1

 

 

Minerals Allocations

A49 The Black Country Minerals Study (BCMS, Tables 12.10 and 12.9) lists all known existing mineral sites and mineral infrastructure sites in the Black Country. Existing mineral sites within the Black Country include permitted mineral extraction sites, stockpiles, brick and tile works, and a pot clay factory. Existing Black Country mineral infrastructure sites include secondary / recycled aggregates production, rail-linked aggregates depots, coating plants, ready-mix (RMX) concrete batching plants, manufacture of concrete products, and dry silo mortar (DSM) plants.

A50 Under Policy MIN2 (Minerals Safeguarding Areas, MSAs), the BCA will safeguard all existing mineral sites and mineral infrastructure sites from inappropriate development – this being necessary in order to retain existing capacity, and thereby helping to make best use of and conserve the Black Country's finite mineral resources and meet Strategic Priority 14, to manage the Black Country's mineral resources (Objective - Meeting our resource and infrastructure needs).

A51 The locations of these Black Country mineral sites and mineral infrastructure sites are identified on the Minerals Key Diagram; those sites located within Dudley Borough are listed in the following tables:
 

Table 19 - Mineral Sites in Dudley

BCP Site Ref

Previous Local Plan Ref

Site Name

Location

Use

MSD1

n/a

Dreadnought Brickworks

Dreadnought Road, Pensnett

Operational brickworks


 

Table 20 - Mineral infrastructure sites in Dudley (BCP Policy MIN2)

Site Ref

Previous Local Plan Ref

Site Name

Location

Type

MID1

n/a

Accumix Concrete

Ham Lane, Kingswinford

Concrete Batching Plant

MID2

n/a

Bell Recycling Centre

Oak Lane, Kingswinford

Aggregates Recycling

MID3

n/a

Breedon Dudley (Brierley Hill) Concrete Plant

Off Delph Road, Brierley Hill

Concrete Batching Plant

MID4

n/a

Dudleymix Concrete

Peartree Lane, Netherton

Concrete Batching Plant

MID5

n/a

Oak Lane Aggregates Recycling Site

Oak Lane, Kingswinford

Aggregates Recycling

MID6

n/a

SW Jackson Aggregates

Off Oak Lane, Kingswinford

Concrete Batching Plant

MID7

n/a

Regen R8 Limited

Timmis Road, Lye

Aggregates Recycling


 

Policies for Strategic Allocations

Policy DSA1 Land South of Holbeach Lane /Wolverhampton Road, Kingswinford

Policy DSA1 Land South of Holbeach Lane /Wolverhampton Road, Kingswinford

 

A52 The Land South of Holbeache Lane / Wolverhampton Road Strategic Allocation falls within the Kingswinford Neighbourhood Growth Area and covers BCP Allocation DUH208. It is proposed that the site be removed from the green belt and be allocated to deliver approximately 330 homes at an average net density of 40 dph.

A53 The estimated phasing of delivery is:

  • 2030 - 2035 155 homes
  • 2035 – 2039 175 homes

A54 There will be a requirement for the development of the site to deliver homes and infrastructure of the highest quality design and functionality, and to accommodate the required infrastructure provision to fully mitigate for the release of this site from the green belt and to deliver maximum benefits to the local environment and community. The key planning requirements for the Holbeache Lane / Wolverhampton Road Strategic Allocation are set out below. Other standard policy requirements, as set out in the BCP and Dudley Local Plan documents and SPDs, will also apply. A masterplan will be prepared to guide the development of the Strategic Allocation. This will provide further detail on the requirements set out in this policy and will provide a spatial framework for development.

A55 The site is in one ownership and is situated in close proximity to strategic sites and Policy DSA2: Land at Swindon Road, Wall Heath, Kingswinford Strategic Allocation and Policy DSA3: Ketley Quarry Strategic Allocation. The cumulative impact of the sites (and other housing / employment allocations) on local infrastructure provision will need to be considered, in terms of:

  • school place impacts;
  • highways impacts;
  • delivery of green belt loss mitigation;
  • delivery of biodiversity net gain;
  • delivery of recreational open space improvement.

A56 Once the BCP has been adopted, allocations should be developed in accordance with the criteria identified in respect of each site and all general policy requirements, including any necessary developer contributions.

School Place Requirements

A57 It is currently anticipated that both primary and secondary school place requirements arising from housing developments in the north west of Dudley over the Plan period will be capable of being met through extensions to existing primary and secondary schools. Pedestrian and public transport improvements to increase accessibility to local primary and secondary schools may be required in accordance with Policy HOU2.

Highways Requirements

A58 It is essential that a cycling and walking network which includes active travel routes around key sites should form a key part of the site layout providing connections to all nearby local amenities, including local primary schools and local centres. These connections should include pedestrian crossing improvements at the A449 to enable safe crossing of the highway. Details will need to be set out in the master plan.

A59 It is considered that a vehicular access point could be gained from the existing roundabout (A449 / A491) to the west of the site, subject to junction capacity analysis and wider transport modelling. A potential second access to Oak Lane via an improved Ham Lane could be provided. Highway and junction improvements would be required to Wall Heath and Kingswinford centres, as well as Stalling Lane and A449/ Himley Road. Details will be set out in the masterplan.

Green Belt Loss Mitigation Requirements

A60 Measures to provide sufficient mitigation for the loss of green belt cannot be confirmed yet; rather this will be set out in the publication version of the BCP.

A61 There will be a requirement for all green belt loss mitigation works and any necessary transfer of land ownership to be completed before the substantial completion of development.

A62 The green belt boundary has been redrawn around the development site. In most cases there is an existing landscaped buffer or road that provides a defensible new green belt boundary. It is recommended that a buffer of landscaped open space is provided along the northern portion of the site, in order to ensure development is appropriately screened from the historically sensitive Holbeache Lane and Holbeache House. Developments should be designed to minimise potential harm to the integrity of remaining green belt areas and to landscape character, as identified in the Black Country Green Belt Study and Black Country Landscape Sensitivity Assessment.

Nature Conservation and Net Biodiversity Gain Requirements

A63 All existing SINCs, SLINCs, tree preservation orders, hedgerows, woodland and significant trees both within and adjoining the development sites should be retained, protected and incorporated sympathetically into the design of development. Sufficient buffer areas should be provided at the edge of these habitat areas, particularly mature trees and hedgerows, to allow them to thrive following development (see ENV4).

A64 It is anticipated that net biodiversity gain requirements for the developments will be met through delivery of the green belt loss mitigation requirements, subject to the minimum 10% requirement identified in the Environment Bill / Act and the requirements of Policy ENV3.

Historic Environment Requirements

A65 Located adjacent to this allocation, on its northern boundary, is the Grade II* listed Holbeache House and its curtilage (List Entry Number 1228293). The impact of any proposals on the setting and significance of this designated heritage asset will be a material planning consideration for development. Also, in close proximity to this allocation, on its northern and north-eastern boundary, is the Oak Farm Wedge Area of High Historic Landscape Value (AHHLV 38), a non-designated heritage asset.

A66 Applicants will therefore be required to support their proposals with a Statement of Heritage Significance (prepared in accordance with Historic England's latest guidance) illustrating that proposals have been formulated with a full appreciation of the requirements of Section 66(1) of the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 and with the policies relating to designated and non-designated heritage assets laid out in the NPPF and local plan.

A67 The design of the development should not impact on the existing character and appearance of Holbeache Lane, which provides a significant contribution to the setting and significance of Holbeache House and is also one of the positive features that contributes to the Oak Farm Wedge AHHLV.

Recreational Open Space Requirements

A68 The incorporation of high-quality landscaping across the development should be a significant forethought of the design process. A well landscaped green buffer is required to the north of the site, which should also provide a neighbourhood area for play. In effect this should separate development completely from the historically sensitive elements to the north.

A69 Further to this, there should be some offsetting of development to the south of the site where existing dwelling houses are located, and well-used informal pedestrian routes exist. It is understood that a high-pressure gas pipeline runs across the middle of the site, which may require some offsetting of development if it were to be retained.

Sustainable Drainage Requirements

A70 Naturalised sustainable drainage systems that are sufficient to retain greenfield runoff rates should be provided for the site, in accordance with Policy CC6. An allowance for the space necessary to accommodate these systems has been made when defining the indicative net developable area. This allowance may be adjusted when the master plan is prepared.

Local Wastewater Treatment Capacity

A71 This site is served by Roundhill WwTW and it is not anticipated that there are any issues with the site handling additional flow during the Plan period.

Design principles

A72 The development of the site will form a new community and neighbourhood on green belt land; all proposals must have distinguishable merit in their design and form. Only high-quality design that is bespoke, unique and specific to the site will be acceptable, in line with the requirements of Policies CSP4 and ENV9 among others. The incorporation of high-quality landscaping across the development should be a significant part of the initial design process. A well-landscaped green buffer is required to the north of the site, which should also provide a neighbourhood area for play. It should also be a continuous green thread, which links in with other treed areas and hedgerows in and around the site to provide a meaningful wildlife corridor. All mature trees and hedgerows should be maintained as this will be vital to mitigate some of the visual impact of developing this green belt site.

A73 Development should sit behind the existing tree-lined boundary along the A449 and should be outward looking making use of continuous perimeter roads to aid connectivity and permeability. The site as a whole should be highly permeable, avoiding the use of private drives and cul-de-sacs that limit on-foot and cycle connectivity. The layout of development should consider as a priority the amenity of existing residents to the south of the site, specifically those with dwellings that back onto it. Where possible the site layout should also seek to maintain and maximise key views across the development (predominantly south-east to north-west). Although there are no key commutable desire lines across the site, at current it is well-used for leisure by residents. This reinforces the need for a well-connected and permeable site layout as well as for an enhanced element of open space to make up for the loss of the site as whole.

A74 Due to the sensitive historic location of the site and existing green belt setting, it is considered that apartments would not be acceptable here.

Nature Conservation and Net Biodiversity Gain Requirements

A75 The site is currently a large arable field surrounded by species-rich hedgerows – designated as SLINC, with rich ground flora. The site is adjacent to a woodland SLINC and has connectivity to the wider open countryside to the north of the site via arable fields and hedgerows. Mature hedgerows form the boundary of the arable area and the grassland areas of the site. These will need to be retained as part of the development as they support a wide variety of flora, support breeding birds and create a nesting and foraging habitat for many species. They include large stretches of intact, stock-proof hedge, and stretches of defunct, non-stock proof, hedge with gaps. The hedgerow adjacent to the Wolverhampton Road (A491) has several large, mature trees within it, including Norway maple and aspen. These will need to be retained as part of the development.

 

Policy DSA2– Land at Swindon Road, Wall Heath, Kingswinford (The Triangle site) Strategic Allocation

Policy DSA2– Land at Swindon Road, Wall Heath, Kingswinford (The Triangle site) Strategic Allocation

 

A76 Land at Swindon Road, Wall Heath, Kingswinford will be allocated for new residential growth and will form part of the Kingswinford Neighbourhood Growth Area; it includes BCP Allocation DUH211. It is proposed that the site be removed from the green belt and be allocated to deliver approximately 533 homes at an average net density of 40 dph.

A77 The estimated phasing of delivery is:

  • 2030 - 2035 280 homes
  • 2035- 2039 253 homes

A78 There will be a requirement for the development of the site to deliver homes and infrastructure of the highest quality design and functionality, and to accommodate the required infrastructure provision to fully mitigate for the release of this site from the green belt and to deliver maximum benefits to the local environment and community. There will be a requirement for the development of the site to be of the highest quality and accommodate the correct infrastructure provision in the right places. The key planning requirements for the Swindon Road, Wall Heath Strategic Allocation are set out below. Other standard policy requirements, as set out in the BCP and Dudley Local Plan documents and SPDs, will also apply. A master plan will be prepared to guide the development of the strategic allocation. This will provide further detail on the requirements set out in this Policy and will provide a spatial framework for development.

A79 The site is in one ownership and is situated near strategic sites: Policy DSA1: South of Holbeache Lane / Wolverhampton Road Strategic Allocation and Policy DSA3: Ketley Quarry Strategic Allocation. The cumulative impact of these sites (and other housing / employment allocations) on local infrastructure provision will need to be considered, in terms of:

  • school place impacts;
  • highways impacts;
  • delivery of green belt loss mitigation;
  • delivery of biodiversity net gain;
  • delivery of recreational open space improvement.

A80 Once the BCP has been adopted, allocations should be developed in accordance with the criteria identified in respect of each site and all general policy requirements, including any necessary developer contributions.

School Place Requirements

A81 It is currently anticipated that both primary and secondary school place requirements arising from housing developments in the north west of Dudley over the Plan period will be capable of being met through extensions to existing primary and secondary schools. Pedestrian and public transport improvements to increase accessibility to local primary and secondary schools may be required in accordance with Policy HOU2.

A82 Should it be determined that some form of primary school provision is required as the BCP progresses towards adoption, this may need to be accommodated on the site and land will need to be allocated to accommodate a two-form entry primary school (approximately 2.4ha).

Highways Requirements

A83 Highway infrastructure is necessary in order for any development to function effectively and to minimise impacts on surrounding road junctions. It is considered that there should be three points of vehicular access, including from Swindon Road to the north and Lodge Lane to the south. The number of access points required, and their precise location should be subject to further detailed transport assessment. Connections should be made through the site, so that pedestrians and vehicles can travel from Swindon Road, through to the A449 or Lodge Lane as they choose. A cycling and walking network which includes active travel routes around key sites should form a key part of the site layout providing connections to all nearby local amenities, including local primary schools and local centres. Details will need to be set out in the master plan.

Green Belt Loss Mitigation Requirements

A84 Measures to provide sufficient mitigation for the loss of green belt cannot be confirmed yet; rather this will be set out in the publication version of the BCP.

A85 There will be a requirement for all green belt loss mitigation works and any necessary transfer of land ownership to be completed before substantial completion of development. Being a green belt site, the retention and provision of high-quality landscaping should be a significant first stage in the design process. Aside from the aforementioned considerations regarding open space, mature trees along the periphery and within the site should be retained, as well as hedgerows within the site where possible.

A86 The green belt boundary has been redrawn around the development site. In most cases there is an existing landscaped buffer or road that provides a defensible new green belt boundary. A significant level of well-landscaped open space should be retained, providing a landscaped open space buffer along the western side of the site where the impact on views is highest and there are clear constraints to development (notably the north-westernmost and south-westernmost fields, due to their topography and the potential impact of development on visual amenity in this location). Development will be concentrated in the easternmost portion of the site, where impacts on views and the surrounding area would be lowest. It is likely that higher densities could be accommodated here than in locations to the west. Developments should be designed to minimise potential harm to the integrity of remaining green belt areas and landscape character, as identified in the Black Country Green Belt Study and Black Country Landscape Sensitivity Assessment.

Nature Conservation and Net Biodiversity Gain Requirements

A87 The site sits on the fringe of the urban area, with links to wider greenspace and open countryside. The site is surrounded by hedgerows that are of high ecological value due to the species that they support. Both the internal and boundary hedgerows contain mature trees, which should be retained as part of the site's features. These current hedgerow lines are growing along pre-existing / old boundaries. The site as a whole assists in the movement and migration of species as well as providing important feeding areas for local and migratory wildlife populations. There is potential for bat roosting sites in the mature hedgerow trees. Bat and bird boxes could be installed on some of the mature trees to provide nesting and roosting opportunities. A mixed semi-natural woodland occurs in the form of a small wooded copse, situated in the west of the site. Opportunities for enhancement and planting around this part of the site should be explored in line with Policy ENV4 - Trees, Woodland and Hedgerows. A management plan for the long-term maintenance of the woodland would also be required.

A88 It is anticipated that net biodiversity gain requirements for the developments will be met through delivery of the green belt loss mitigation requirements set out above.

A89 Policy ENV3 - will apply to this site.

Historic Environment Requirements

A90 Located adjacent to this strategic allocation, on its south-eastern edge is the Grade II listed Summerhill Hotel (List Entry Number 1228678). The impact of any development proposals on the setting and significance of this designated heritage asset will be a material planning consideration. Applicants will therefore be required to support their proposals with a Statement of Heritage Significance (prepared in accordance with Historic England's latest guidance) illustrating that proposals have been formulated with a full appreciation of the requirements of Section 66(1) of the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 and with the policies relating to designated heritage assets laid out in the NPPF and local plan.

A91 Within this allocation there is one site recorded on the Council's Historic Environment Record (HER), HER record 12113, which relates to a medieval book fitting. In view of this and in view of the fact that the allocation still retains the majority of its original field boundaries (as marked on the first edition OS) applicants will be required to support their proposals with a historic environment desk-based assessment, undertaken in accordance with guidance provided by the Chartered Institute for Archaeologist (CIfA).

Recreational Open Space Requirements

A92 Subject to satisfactory delivery of mitigation for the loss of green belt, it is considered that the local area will have good access to existing recreational open space, allotment, play and sports facilities that have the capacity to meet the varied needs of new residents, in line with adopted open space standards. Therefore, no new on-site open space will be required, beyond that necessary to protect existing nature conservation value and provide sufficient natural, sustainable drainage systems. However, it will be necessary to provide quality walking and cycle routes within the developments that provide easy, quick and safe access to nearby open spaces and the countryside.

Sustainable Drainage Requirements

A93 Naturalised sustainable drainage systems that are sufficient to retain greenfield runoff rates should be provided for the site, in accordance with Policy CC6. An allowance for the space necessary to accommodate these systems has been made when defining the indicative net developable area. This allowance may be adjusted when the master plan is prepared.

Local Wastewater Treatment Capacity

A94 This site is served by Roundhill WwTW and it is not anticipated that there are any issues with the site handling additional flow during the Plan period.

Design principles

A95 Due to the tree-lined periphery of the site and its topography, it is considered that development would be best located at the edge of the site, fronting directly onto Swindon Road and Lodge Lane. The chosen layout must be highly permeable and well connected, prioritising pedestrian and cycle users, maximising the feeling of enclosure and responding to human scales. Proposals should avoid the use of private drives and cul-de-sacs, as these hinder good on-foot / cycle connectivity. As such it is likely that proposals brought forward will differ to much of the existing morphology (cul-de-sac) in the surrounding area. As the site will create a new community / neighbourhood on green belt land, proposals must have distinguishable merit in their design and form. Only high-quality design that is bespoke, unique and specific to the site will be acceptable.

A96 Existing desire lines are well-used by local residents for leisure and walking to / from Summerhill School in the south. These should be retained and routes for school commuters diverted as little as possible.

 


Policy DSA3 - Land at Ketley Quarry, Kingswinford

Policy DSA3 - Land at Ketley Quarry, Kingswinford

A97 Land at Ketley Quarry, Kingswinford will be allocated for new residential growth and will form part of the North West Regeneration Core Area covering BCP Allocations DUH203 and DUH221. The site's gross area is 20.81ha of which 13.52 ha of the site is developable for 612 dwellings based on 40 - 45dph.

A98 The estimated phasing of delivery is:

  • 2024 – 2029 50 homes
  • 2030 - 2035 250 homes
  • 2035 - 2039 312 homes

A99 There will be a requirement for the development of the site to deliver homes and infrastructure be of the highest quality design and functionality, and to accommodate the required infrastructure provision in appropriate locations. The key planning requirements for the Ketley Quarry Strategic Allocation are set out below. Other standard policy requirements, as set out in the BCP and Dudley Local Plan documents and SPDs, will also apply. A master plan will be prepared to guide the development of the strategic allocation. This will provide further detail on the requirements set out in this Policy and will provide a spatial framework for development.

A100 The Quarry and adjacent sites are in separate ownership and are situated in close proximity to strategic sites identified in Policy DSA1: South of Holbeache Lane / Wolverhampton Road and Policy DSA2: land at Swindon Road, Wall Heath. The cumulative impact of these sites (and other housing / employment allocations) on local infrastructure provision will need to be considered, in terms of:

  • school place impacts;
  • highways impacts;
  • delivery of biodiversity net gain;
  • delivery of recreational open space improvements

A101 Once the BCP has been adopted, allocations should be developed in accordance with the criteria identified in respect of each site and all other relevant general policy requirements, including any necessary developer contributions.

School Place Requirements

A102 It is currently anticipated that both primary and secondary school place requirements arising from housing developments in the north west of Dudley over the Plan period will be capable of being met through extensions to existing primary and secondary schools. Pedestrian and public transport improvements to increase accessibility to local primary and secondary schools may be required in accordance with Policy HOU2.

A103 Should it be determined that some form of primary school provision is required as the BCP progresses towards adoption, this may need to be accommodated on the site and land will need to be allocated to accommodate a two-form entry primary school (approximately 2.4ha).

Highways Requirements

A104 Highway infrastructure is necessary in order for any development to function effectively and to minimise impacts on surrounding road junctions. It is considered that there should be vehicular access, of Dudley Road with a possible secondary access of Ketley Road, by Ketley Farm. The number of access points required, and their precise location should be subject to further detailed transport assessment. A cycling and walking network which includes active travel routes around key sites should form a key part of the site layout providing connections to all nearby local amenities, including local primary schools and local centres. Details will need to be set out in the master plan.

Nature Conservation and Net Biodiversity Gain Requirements

A105 There is a statutory designation for features of geological significance (SSSI) at the north of the site and two non-statutory geological designations (SINC) within the site. The SSSI designation is a geological outcrop of the Etruria Formation, created during the Carboniferous Period (359 - 299 million years ago). The wider site is designated as a SLINC. The vast majority of the site is a disused quarry and is made up of bare ground and large mounds of quarry spoil. Parts of the quarry have become vegetated with early successional species and tall ruderal vegetation. The disused Tansy Green branch railway line runs to the east of the site, providing a further link to Fens Pools Nature Reserve to the south. Dawley Brook to the east of the site is designated as a SINC. The site also contains three distinct areas of woodland, with the belt to the east and southwest of the site acting as a boundary feature.

A106 Bat and bird surveys, including for barn owls, will need to be carried out in the abandoned farmhouse and surrounding buildings. Other surveys such as reptile and badger surveys may also be required.

A107 Policy ENV3 - Biodiversity Net Gain will apply to this site.

Historic Environment Requirements

A108 This allocation is the site of the former Ketley Colliery (HER 7963) recorded as being mostly abandoned by the production of the first edition OS in 1884. It also contains the site of Ketley Quarry (also recorded on the first edition OS), which is one of the 'Geo-sites' located within the Black Country Geopark, (see Policy ENV6)[5].

A109 Located in the north-west corner of this allocation, adjacent to the road, is the site of a weighbridge and its associated Weights and Measures building (HER15424). The buildings first appeared on the Fourth Edition OS (1937-1948). Any proposed development should seek to incorporate these heritage assets into any future proposals for this part of the site along with suitable interpretation information.

A110 Located in the southern part of the allocation is the site of Stourbridge Extension Canal (HER 7385), built during the 1830s and opened in 1840. Proposals for the site should seek to include within it sympathetic ways of revealing the significance of this heritage asset.

Recreational Open Space Requirements

A111 It will be necessary to provide good-quality walking and cycle routes within the developments, which can provide easy, quick and safe access to nearby open spaces and the countryside.

Sustainable Drainage Requirements

A112 Naturalised sustainable drainage systems that are sufficient to retain greenfield runoff rates should be provided for the site, in accordance with Policy CC6. An allowance for the space necessary to accommodate these systems has been made when defining the indicative net developable area. This allowance may be adjusted when the master plan is prepared.

Local Wastewater Treatment Capacity

A113 This site is served by Roundhill WwTW and it is not anticipated that there are any issues with the site handling additional flow during the Plan period.

Design principles

A114 New development will have a density of no more than 40 - 45dph and will also retain a network of public open space across the site. Any proposed development should create a permeable layout by connecting the surrounding vehicle roads and pedestrian routes with a network of public open space and tree-lined streets. Layouts should incorporate 'back to back garden' housing and avoid the rear or sides of gardens facing the streets and public realm. Existing trees and on-site biodiversity value (according to the outcome of robust surveys) must be safeguarded and incorporated into the proposed layouts. These assets should form part of the publicly accessible open space and should not be located within any private plots, except in exceptional circumstance. Corner plots should be designed to address both aspects e.g. consider and propose a dual building frontage to minimise blank / dead frontages. All public open space should be overlooked by housing.

 

Local Green Space Designations

A115 Local Green Space designation is a way to provide special protection for green areas of particular importance to local communities. The Council has designated an area of green space for special protection, as outlined in the policy table below. The Local Green Space has been put forward by the local community, with a strong evidence base, due to its local importance. The area has been identified on the Dudley Proposals Map.
 

Policy DSA4 Corbett Meadow Local Green Space

Policy DSA4 Corbett Meadow Local Green Space

A116 The area shown on the Proposals Map is allocated as Corbett Meadow Local Green Space. In line with national policy the site will be protected from inappropriate development, unless there are very special circumstances that outweigh the harm to the site.

A117 The views of the local community will also need to be taken into account when considering any development proposals on the site.

A118 Designation of land as Local Green Space is set out in the NPPF, allowing communities to identify and protect green areas of particular importance to them. It has been demonstrated that Corbett Meadow meets the criteria set out in Paragraph 100 of the NPPF (2019). The site of the meadow was purchased by local philanthropist John Corbett in 1892 to provide a hospital and the gardens and public grounds were to be used for the purposes of a public park. The site supports a variety of wildlife and is made up of flower-rich lowland meadow pasture, many wooded areas of veteran age and natural ponds.

Nature Conservation Alterations and Designations

A119 Dudley Council will safeguard and enhance designated nature conservation sites, habitats and features through the development process and in accordance with the Black Country Plan, in particular Policy ENV1 and the Dudley Borough Development Strategy Policy S21.

A120 A number of designations or amendments have been made to Nature Conservation sites which have been adopted by the Council. Details of the sites are shown in Appendix A4. In addition, site and designation boundaries can be viewed on the online Policies Map for Dudley.

 

 

B. Sandwell

Introduction

B.1 Sandwell is a metropolitan borough in the Black Country, made up of six towns: Oldbury, Rowley Regis, Smethwick, Tipton, Wednesbury and West Bromwich. With 327,378 residents, Sandwell has the third largest population in the West Midlands Combined Authority area and is the 34th largest local authority in Great Britain. The borough's population is predicted to grow faster than both that of the West Midlands and the national average.

B.2 Sandwell has many growing and productive businesses and a higher than average proportion of its businesses are small, but residents are not always able to take up opportunities related to those employment and economic activities. Local businesses will often need a highly skilled workforce to be able to grow to meet modern demands; that workforce needs training and support to help deliver and accelerate innovation. Sandwell also has a limited amount of the type of high quality land needed to enable businesses to expand and grow in the borough's industrial core.

B.3 Creating a clean, attractive and safe living environment in Sandwell is a key priority, as is developing a robust response to climate change in an area with a complex industrial heritage and its associated legacy of land, water and air pollution

B.4 Although Sandwell has many challenges, it also has a significant number of opportunities. The BCP and Sandwell's own Inclusive Economy Deal will be focusing on the challenges for people, place and business and the opportunities that are available to make a difference.

B.5 The aim is to deliver a healthier, more successful future for the people of Sandwell – working closely together with residents, businesses and other stakeholders.
 

The Strategy

B.6 The 2030 Vision for Sandwell is:

'It's where we call home and where we're proud to belong - where we choose to bring up our families, where we feel safe and cared for, enjoying good health, rewarding work, feeling connected and valued in our neighbourhoods and communities, confident in the future, and benefiting fully from a revitalised West Midlands'.

B.7 The BCP forms an essential part of this strategy, supporting the re-energising, diversification and re-purposing of the borough, supporting the recovery and growth of our economy, and providing for a continuous supply of new homes to meet the needs of our communities.

B.8 The BCP will ensure that the borough's network of open spaces will be protected and enhanced to support its natural assets, and continue to provide opportunities to improve health and well-being whilst ensuring at the same time, that development is located where it can provide convenient access for all sections of the community to work, shopping, health, education, leisure, green space and other facilities.

B.9 This Plan supports the delivery of 9,158 new homes and 126,000 jobs to 2039, supporting the growth of the borough's population and a workforce of 108,000. To plan for this growth, the Council is prioritising locations that are both sustainable and deliverable in line with the Spatial Strategy set out in Policy CSP1.
 

Figure 17 - Sandwell Spatial Plan

Figure 17 - Sandwell Spatial Plan

 

Table 21 - Sandwell Growth targets (net) 2020 - 2039

Location

Housing

Employment Land allocations (ha)

 

The Growth Network

Strategic Centre

201

200 (Uplift to be tested)

= 401

0

 

Sandwell Central Core Regeneration Area

2,032

28

 

Towns and Neighbourhood Areas

Neighbourhood Growth Areas

N/A

N/A

 

Other Sites in Towns and Neighbourhood Areas

4,997

0

 

Small Windfall Housing Sites

1,728

N/A

 

Total

9,158

28

 
       


 

West Bromwich Strategic Centre

B.10 West Bromwich Strategic Centre, as designated on the Policies Map and shown on Figure 17 is the third largest centre in the Black Country and It is the focus for a wide range of civic, retail, cultural and leisure functions. The centre is organised around a strong linear high street form. The High Street runs north-west to south-east with a focus on high street retail activity along the pedestrianised Princess Parade / Duchess Parade section, which is enclosed by the West Bromwich Ringway. It is a highly accessible location by a range of public transport options including rail, metro and bus services.

B.11 This Plan supports the diversification, repurposing and rejuvenation of the Strategic Centre, being a focus for a well-balanced mix of commercial, business and service uses. Changing shopping patterns and challenges to the high street will be addressed through increased flexibility and facilitating the consolidation of the shopping core (particularly to reduce vacancy rates), complemented by surrounding office and leisure-led mixed uses, and supported by maximising residential provision in all locations (including the use of upper floors).

B.12 The future of the centre, as with most Strategic Centres across the Black Country, is dependent on ensuring less reliance on retail to generate footfall and to generate alternative uses (potentially mixed uses) that function both during the day and into the evening.

Figure 18 - West Bromwich Strategic Centre

Figure 18 - West Bromwich Strategic Centre

B.13 The Strategic Centre benefits from an existing Area Action Plan (AAP) which was adopted in 2011. The AAP will be reviewed following the adoption of the BCP. Until the AAP review is completed, all AAP policies remain relevant for proposals within the BCP boundary of West Bromwich Strategic Centre.

B.14 Therefore, for the purposes of applying Policies CEN1- CEN6, within West Bromwich Strategic Centre the following AAP policies are relevant in defining in-centre boundaries:

  • Retail – Primary Shopping Area (AAP Policies)
  • Conservation Area - AAP boundary (and AAP Policy) WBP8
    1. The housing capacity for West Bromwich Strategic Centre set out in Table 21 is based on existing permissions and AAP allocations, but also includes an estimated uplift based on more recent evidence, including the Black Country Centres study and emerging development proposals, as detailed in the Black Country Urban Capacity Review Update 2021. This housing capacity figure will be further tested, in detail, through the AAP review, but provides a sound basis to understand the housing capacity of the City Centre for the purposes of this Plan.
       
West Bromwich Masterplan and Interim Planning Statement (IPS)

B.16 Until the review of the AAP and to aid regeneration of the centre and stimulate a Covid -19 recovery, a masterplan and Interim Planning Statement has been commissioned with a final report due mid-summer 2021. It is hoped that the masterplan will act as a catalyst for on-going and new regeneration schemes for West Bromwich – unlocking further investment and opportunities to boost the town's future economic growth.

B.17 The masterplan will build on the Towns Investment Plan for West Bromwich, which has already been drawn up by the council in response to the Government's Towns Fund programme, with the council bidding for £25 million to help reinvigorate the town.

B.18 The priorities for West Bromwich are to reinvigorate the town centre; unlock land to aid regeneration; support good quality jobs and stimulate Covid-19 recovery by:

  • Repurposing vacant premises and sites in the strategic centre to provide community, education, healthcare provision, with additional residential use being a major contributor in attracting investment and promoting vitality of the centre.
  • Seeking office development in sustainable locations within the centre.
  • Creating a Civil and Mechanical Engineering Centre, delivering a range of apprenticeships and training including in groundworks, street works, steel fixing and scaffolding.
  • Creating a Digital Den to establish affordable digital services for deprived communities; create pathways to opportunities to education and employment via accredited online training courses; provide careers guidance; and provide children with online educational resources so opportunities for learning are always accessible.
  • Regenerating the Town Hall Quarter to establish a fully restored cultural and entertainment offer in the town centre.
  • Transforming the town centre further through site assembly and development paving the way for new markets, education facilities and high-quality housing.
  • Providing a new green corridor to link the centre to Dartmouth Park and Sandwell Valley.
  • Creating cycling and walking routes across the town centre and to Sandwell Valley.
    1. The Interim Planning Statement will take the land use changes proposed by the masterplan forward to be endorsed by the Council.
    2. Following adoption of the BCP, the production of a revised Tier 2 Sandwell Plan will follow approximately six months afterwards, to ensure conformity.
    3. Following adoption of the Sandwell Plan, a formal Area Action Plan (AAP) for West Bromwich Strategic Centre will be produced, incorporating and updating key issues from the masterplan.
       

Sandwell Central Core Growth Area

B.22 The Sandwell Central Core Regeneration Area covers the main employment areas of the Borough, from Smethwick in the south east to Wednesbury in the north, taking in areas of Oldbury, Tipton and West Bromwich.

B.23 The area provides regeneration and renewal opportunities for new employment and residential development, which will be well-connected by public transport, as well as by the new Metro extension. Through residential allocations within the Growth Area there is capacity for 2,032 new dwellings. The area contains 947 hectares of employment land, which will be safeguarded through the protection and improvement of existing employment areas as set out in Policies EMP1, EMP2 and EMP3.

B.24 The area is well-connected by road and rail, with access to the national motorway network at Junctions 1 and 2 of the M5, and sections of the West Midlands Key Route Network, linking Sandwell with the rest of the Black Country and the wider West Midlands area. There are three rail lines running through the area; the Stour Valley Line (Birmingham to Wolverhampton), which forms part of the West Coast Main Line; the Birmingham Snow Hill to Worcester line; and the Birmingham to Rugeley line. The area is also well-served by the West Midlands Metro with the existing Birmingham to Wolverhampton line and will benefit from the opening of the Wednesbury to Brierley extension.

B.25 Further investment in the highway network to support public transport and active travel is planned through the Key Route Network Corridor Investments Plans.
 

Delivering the Strategy

B.26 This strategy will be delivered by:

  • An early review of the adopted West Bromwich Area Action Plan (AAP) to refresh detailed site allocations within the Strategic Centre boundary in a comprehensive manner.
  • The allocation of sites and implementation of policies in this Plan across the administrative area to accommodate housing and employment development.
  • The saving of policies contained in the Sandwell SADDPD and West Bromwich AAP unless specifically replaced by Policies in the Black Country Plan as listed in Appendix B1.
  1. Tables 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, and 29 provide details of all development allocations and waste and minerals allocations made through the BCP within Sandwell (outside the West Bromwich Strategic Centre boundary).
  2. Several of the allocations replace existing ones identified in adopted local plan documents, which previously formed part of the Sandwell Policies Map. Where this is the case, the previous allocation reference and the Local Plan document concerned are listed. Table 29 and Appendix B1 provides details of other local plan designations in Sandwell that have also been replaced or amended through the BCP. Such changes have only been made where this is necessary to deliver development allocations. All detailed allocation and designation boundaries can be viewed on the online Sandwell Policies Map.
     

Other

Environment and climate change

B.29 In line with the Council's Climate Change Strategy, a local heat network for West Bromwich is at detailed project development stage. This is part of the strategy towards achieving carbon neutrality for Sandwell Council buildings and operations by 2030 and for the borough as a whole by 2041.

B.30 Other heat networks are being explored, albeit these are currently at an initial stage. General 'greening' of the centre, via landscaping and other environmental enhancements is proposed, with improved links to Dartmouth Park and Sandwell Valley.

B.31 As part of the above, the central area will have more meet-and-greet areas to foster non-transactional interactions and drive footfall, thus bolstering a reduced but viable amount of retail and other centre uses.
 

Sandwell Valley

B.32 The Council will investigate opportunities for utilising the Sandwell Valley for leisure and tourism through the Cultural Strategy, whilst respecting its green belt status and the other nature conservation allocations it contains.
 

Development Allocations

Table 22 - Sandwell Residential Site Allocations (BCP Policy HOU1)

BCP Site Ref / Location - (Sandwell Central Growth Area (SCGA))

Previous Local Plan Allocation (replaced unless stated)

Site Name and Address

Appropriate Uses

Indicative Development Capacity (net homes)

Gross Site Area (ha) (brownfield /greenfield)

Indicative Net Developable Area (ha)

Net Density (dph)

Anticipated Delivery Timescale

Further Information

SAH226

N/A

Land to north of Painswick Close Sub Station

Housing

120

4.3 (G)

To be determined

28

 

Site removed from the GB. Green Belt mitigation will be required

Majority of site is a SLINC (SA006 Land at Yew Tree) mitigation measures will be required

See below for more detailed information

The Rushall Canal bounds the site to the east and community open space to the west. The Q3 academy is located to the east of the site over the canal and there are established pedestrian routes to the north of the site and indeed through the middle over the canal via a restricted byway. There is an extensive Electricity Distribution site to the southwest. The greatest asset of this site is its location next to the canal and open space; opportunities to overlook these spaces should be maximised and there is potential to raise the heights of the building in these areas.
There are pylons and overhead lines present to the south of the site. The National Grid Design Guide states that 'as these guidelines show, where development is proposed on a site crossed by an overhead line there are good operational and amenity reasons - not to do with EMFs (sic. Electro Magnetic Fields) - for not siting built development directly beneath overhead lines'. If this area was left as undeveloped, it would aid in providing mitigation from development for the SLINC on the rest of the site. Not developing this area would also provide a sizeable buffer between the motorway and built form.
The current main issue is that there doesn't appear to be a viable access option from an existing adopted highway.
All current potential access points cross private driveways to dwellings and hence to open up development opportunities would require the purchase of private properties and demolition to provide access from either Caledonian Close, Delamere Drive and/or Broom Road. For a residential site of this proposed size, two accesses are preferred, for amenity and highways safety issues.
If a suitable access could be found then the junction of Greenside Way and Walsall Road would need to be tested for capacity and safety.
The area is adjacent to Rushall Canal and hence the need to provide a Flood Risk Assessment and suitable and complimentary sustainable drainage and flood prevention measures must be emphasised. No evidence of existing flooding issues currently exists. The Council would not wish to accept underground attenuation tanks as a solution as this is currently a green field site.

SAH224

N/A

Land off Tanhouse Avenue, Great Barr

Housing

50

2.49 (G)

1.25

40

 

Site removed from the GB. GB mitigation will be required.

Submitted as a CfS – 40

Majority of the site is a SLINC (SA045 – Tanhouse Avenue) so mitigation measures will be required.

Small part of the site is a SINC (0.21ha).

Part of site is Community Open Space – replacement in wider site which will need to be mitigated

See below for more detailed information

The site slopes to the south and rises from east to west, so that the western part of the site is level with the road.
A SINC separates the two sites, which includes an access road to the RSPB reserve running through the middle of it. Houses on either site should face onto this area for reasons of safety and security.
A railway track bounds the site to the south, which separates the site from Sandwell Valley.
There is an access road that serves a social club that bounds the site on the southwest boundary.
A public foul gravity lateral drain runs almost parallel to the railway on the southern boundary. Development here would need to retain a standoff distance from the sewer unless it was diverted.
Within the planning application (DC/17/60630) for flood protection works to the wider area, the Environment Agency were intending to plant trees to the southern boundary of the site as a visual screen. If this has been carried out, it may prevent development on this section; however, there is a sewer / drain in a similar location that requires a standoff from it.
The front of the site has a strong treeline, which should be retained.
Consideration would need to be given in terms of capacity and safety to the junctions of;
Tanhouse Avenue and Hamstead Road; Bowstoke Road and Newton Road; Newton Road and Hamstead Road
Consideration should be given to additional traffic on Tanhouse Avenue and the potential need for additional safety measures, particularly near to Hamstead Junior School and Hamstead Primary School.
The current access road to the RSPB Nature centre runs through the middle of the site and needs to be retained.
Each parcel of land to either side of the RSPB access road could be served by their own entrance from Tanhouse Avenue, although the distance from other existing junctions would need to meet current Residential Design Guidance Standards.
Proposed roads on any new estate must have traffic calming and 20mph zones designed in from the start as an integral part of the overall urban design package, not simply bolted on afterwards.
Area is close (adjacent?) to a large River Tame floodplain area, currently subject to new flood defence works and hence the need to provide suitable and complementary sustainable drainage and Flood Prevention measures needs to be emphasised. Liaison with the Environment Agency will be required due to the proximity to the main river.
There is evidence of some surface water flooding issues on Tanhouse Road that would need to be considered by Flood Risk Assessment. The Council would not wish to accept underground attenuation tanks as a solution here as currently the area is a greenfield site.

SAH225

 

Charlemont Community Centre

Housing

1

0.05 (B)

To be determined

20

 

Site removed from the GB. GB mitigation will be required.

Submitted as a CfS – 263

Site is surrounded by COS

SAH091

HOC7

Land at Friar Park Road, Wednesbury

Housing

750

26.65 (G) and (B)

Masterplanning will determine the net development area

28

2024 - 2039

Joint Venture between Sandwell Council and WMCA and have commissioned a Masterplan and remediation strategy for the land. Outline application anticipated to be submitted by end of 2021 with building commencing 2024. Mitigation needed for SLINC (SA004).

Community Open Space part of site and will need mitigating.

Playing pitches on site and need to be retained or replaced on site

Capacity is an estimate and will be confirmed following Masterplan work

SAH228

 

Brandhall Golf Course

Housing

560

37.2 (G)

Masterplanning will determine the net development area

15

2025-2034

Masterplan has been commissioned.

COS and SLINC (SA097 – Brandhall Golf Course) and Wildlife Corridor on part of site will need to be mitigated.

Capacity is an estimate and will be confirmed following Masterplan work

SAH081

(SCGA)

H12.8

North Smethwick Canalside

Housing

400

8.77 (B)

8.77

46

2028 - 2036

Actively looking at bringing part of this forward with either WMCA or Towns Fund intervention

SAH096

H13.3

Forge Lane / Silverthorne Lane

Housing

127

2.82 (B)

2.82

45

2030-2033

Boundary amended to exclude employment area. Land owner has assembled site.

SAH077

(SCGA)

H12.9

Heartlands Furniture, Cranford Street, Smethwick - Phase 2 of Grove Lane MP

Housing

300

2.4 (B)

To be determined by Masterplan work.

125

2028 - 2036

Masterplan due to be completed August 2021. Estimate first phase to commence in 2025, subject to remediation of the land. Capacity will be confirmed following Masterplan work. Rest of the site will follow.

SAH227

(SCGA)

 

Dudley Road East

Housing

106

2.65 (B)

2.65

40

 

Employment review and site assessment found site suitable for housing

SAH104

(SCGA)

H12.9

Heath Street Housing Zone Deal - Phase 3 of Grove Lane MP

Housing

30

0.9 (B)

To be determined by Masterplan work.

33

2028-2036

Masterplan due to be completed August 2021. Estimate first phase to commence in 2025, subject to remediation of the land. Capacity will be confirmed following Masterplan work Rest of the site will follow.

SAH102

(SCGA)

H12.9

PJ Commercial - Phase 4 of Grove Land Master Plan

Housing

28

0.8 (B)

To be determined by Masterplan work.

35

2028-2036

Masterplan due to be completed August 2021. Estimate first phase to commence in 2025, subject to remediation of the land. Capacity will be confirmed following Masterplan work. Rest of the site will follow.

SAH085

(SCGA)

H12.9

Grove Lane - Phase 5a of Grove Lane Master Plan

Mixed Use

70

1.85 (B)

To be determined by Masterplan work.

38

2028-2036

Masterplan due to be completed August 2021. Estimate first phase to commence in 2025, subject to remediation of the land. Capacity will be confirmed following Masterplan work Rest of the site will follow.

SAH084

H12.9

Abberley Street, Smethwick - Phase 5b of Grove Lane Masterplan

Mixed Use

200

6.27 (B)

To be determined by Masterplan work.

32

2028-2036

Masterplan due to be completed August 2021. Estimate first phase to commence in 2025, subject to remediation of the land. Capacity will be confirmed following Masterplan work. Rest of the site will follow.

SAH105

(SCGA)

H12.9

Phase 6 of Grove Lane MP

Mixed Use

40

1.18 (B)

To be determined by Masterplan work.

34

2028-2036

Masterplan due to be completed August 2021. Estimate first phase to commence in 2025, subject to remediation of the land. Rest of the site will follow.

SAH088

(SCGA)

H9.3

Rattlechain Site, Land to the north of Temple Way, Tividale, Oldbury

Housing

322

14.7 (B)

7.24

45

2034-2039

Land owner in discussions to include other land - looking to masterplan the area.

SLINC on part of the site (SA037-Johns Lane) mitigation may be required

SAH080

H16.5

Bradleys Lane / High Street

Housing

241

5.6 (B)

5.6

45

2034-2039

Redevelopment with the cooperation of owners looking to relocate.

SAH083

(SCGA)

WBPr36

Swan Lane Former Gas Works

Housing

149

5.4 (B)

4.07

37

2033-2038

Land owner interested in bringing site forward for residential use. Capacity as per application discussions

May have an impact on SLINC (SA017 – Snowhill to Wolverhampton Railway) and mitigation may be required

SAH087

(SCGA)

H8.1

Land to east of Black Lake, West Bromwich

Housing

110

2.45 (B)

2.45

45

2035-2038

Land owners want to develop for housing

SAH094

(SCGA)

Post 2021 Housing Site

Langley Maltings, Western Road, Langly

Housing

95

2.72 (B)

2.72

35

2036-2039

Land owner advised will continue to operate but will look at opportunities to move and redevelop

Grade II Listed Building

SAH070

H9.9

Land at Horseley Heath, Alexandra Road and Lower Church Lane, Tipton

Housing

86

2.62 (B)

1.9

45

2037-2039

SLINC (SA028 – Alexandra Road) on part of the site.

Land owner interested in bringing site forward for residential use.

SAH103

HOC8

The Phoenix Collegiate, Friar Park Road, Wednesbury

Housing

84

4.8 (B)

4.8

18

2025-2026

Planning application - DC/20/63911 - for 84 homes

SAH076

(SCGA)

H9.2

Lower City Road, Oldbury

Housing

64

1.83 (B)

1.83

35

2036-2038

Response from some land owners looking to bring site forward. Does not meet accessibility thresholds in HOU2

SAH089

H9.9

Site surrounding former Post Office and Telephone Exchange, Horseley Heath, Tipton

Housing

52

1.16 (B)

1.16

45

2033-2035

 

SAH093

(SCGA)

 

Tatbank Road, Oldbury

Housing

52

1.15 (B)

1.15

45

2036-2038

Land owner advised will continue to operate but will look at opportunities to move and redevelop

SAH082

WBPr25

Carters Green / Gun Lane

Housing

49

1.09 (B)

1.09

45

2031-2033

Part of One Public Estate

SAH092

HOC8

Friar Street, Wednesbury

Housing

45

1.01 (B)

1.01

45

2037-2039

Land owner interested in bringing site forward for residential use

SAH078

WBPr26

John Street

Housing

45

1.01 (B)

1.01

45

2031-2032

Long term plans

SAH073

(SCGA)

H9.6

Wellington Road, Tipton

Housing

40

0.91 (B)

0.91

45

2036-2037

Land owner interested in relocating.

SAH072

H13.9

Elbow Street

Housing

33

0.77 (B)

0.77

45

2029-2030

Land owner advised interested in developing site

SAH086

HOC18

Former Sunlight Laundry, Stanhope Rd, Smethwick

Housing

32

0.73 (B)

0.73

44

2024-2025

Part of Council Housing programme

SAH098

(SCGA)

H9.3

Temple Way (Rattlechain), Tividale, Oldbury

Housing

32

0.9 (B)

0.9

36

2036-2037

Awaiting discussions with neighbouring land owners. Does not meet accessibility thresholds in HOU2

SAH099

(SCGA)

H9.2

Summerton Road

Housing

32

0.89 (B)

0.89

36

2032-2034

Site boundary amended - land owners operate for next 5-10 years with a view to redevelop. Does not meet accessibility thresholds in HOU2

SAH074

WBPr17

Trinity Way / High Street

Residential - Mixed Use

53

0.6 (B)

0.6

88

2031-2033

Land owner advised looking to invest in site in next 5-10 years

SAH067

HOC8

Alma Street, Wednesbury

Housing

23

0.52 (B)

0.52

45

2025-2026

Land owner interested in bringing site forward for development for residential use

SAH090

(SCGA)

H9.6

Used Car Sales site on corner of Lower Church Lane, and Horseley Heath, Tipton

Housing

23

0.56 (B)

0.56

41

2036-2037

Long term plans

SAH069

(SGCA)

H8.8

Beever Road, Great Bridge

Housing

18

1.01 (B)

1.01

18

2024-2025

Part of Council Housing programme. Site constraints

SAH097

H13.4

Cokeland Place / Graingers Lane

Housing

16

0.36 (B)

0.36

45

2030-2031

Land owner interested in bringing site forward for development for residential use

SAH068

HOC13

Hawes Lane, Rowley Regis

Housing

15

0.56 (B)

0.56

27

2024-2025

Part of Council Housing programme. Site constraints

SAH095

H13.1

Macarthur Road

Housing

13

0.3 (B)

0.3

43

2033-2034

Land owner interested in bringing site forward for development for residential use

SAH079

H12.6

West End Avenue

Housing

11

0.32 (B)

0.32

34

2024-2025

Part of Council Housing programme

SAH071

H9.9

Mill Street, Great Bridge

Housing

34

0.86 (B)

0.86

40

2033-2034

Land owner interested in bringing site forward for residential use

SAH075

(SCGA)

HOC6

Bank Street (West), Hateley Heath

Housing

43

0.85 (B)

0.85

51

2028-2030

Land owner advised will be looking to develop for housing

SAH100

 

Edwin Richards Quarry, Portway Road, Rowley Regis

Housing

281

10.1 (B)

10.1

28

2026/2032

Outline expires 2023 - advised they are still looking to develop the site. Capacity as per planning permission

Part of site is Strategic Open Space which cannot be built on.

Part of site is a SLINC (SA070 – Hailstone Quarry) which may require mitigation

SAH100

H12.9

Thandi Coach Station, Alma Street, Smethwick

Housing

58

0.71 (B)

0.71

82

2023-2025

expires 2021 - land owner still showing interest in developing site

SAH229

(SCGA)

 

Brades Road, Oldbury

Housing

51

1.14 (B)

1.14

45

2032-2033

Submitted as a Call for Site

SAH206

H12.4

Kitchener Street, Black Patch Smethwick

Housing

49

1.39 (B)

1.39

35

2030-2035

Identified in Black Patch Interim Planning Statement and Masterplan. Accessibility will need to be addressed.


 

Table 23 - Sandwell Gypsy and Traveller Site Allocations

BCP Site Ref / Location - (Sandwell Central Growth Area (SCGA))

Previous Local Plan Allocation (replaced unless stated)

Address

Appropriate Uses

Gross Site Area

Net Site Area

Indicative Development Capacity

Anticipated Delivery Timescale

Further Information

SAGT28

H16.7

Brierley Lane

Residential

0.73

 

10 Plots

2030-2031

Extension to caravan site - funding required

 

Employment

B.34 Under Policy EMP2, 219 hectares of employment land will be allocated as High-Quality Employment Land and will be safeguarded for manufacturing and logistics uses within Use Classes E(g)(ii), E(g)(iii)), B2 and B8.

B.35 Within Sandwell, High-Quality Employment land is concentrated in three main areas. Two of these are around the M5 - adjacent to Junction one in West Bromwich and adjacent to Junction two in Oldbury; both of these fall within Growth Corridor 12. The third area where there is a concentration of High Quality Employment Land is along the Black Country New Road, from Tipton to Wednesbury, which is in Growth Corridor Eight.

B.36 Under Policy EMP3, a further 890 hectares of employment land will be allocated as Local Quality Employment Land and will be safeguarded for manufacturing and logistics uses within Use Classes E(g)(ii), E(g)(iii)), B2 and B8. The main concentrations of Local Quality Employment are concentrated in Growth Corridors Nine, Oldbury to Tipton and Corridor 12, Oldbury, West Bromwich and Smethwick.

B.37 In addition, there is a further 18 hectares of employment land that is not being allocated; Policy EMP4 will apply to these sites.

B.38 In addition to the existing occupied employment it is proposed to allocate 23 hectares of vacant land as employment development sites. The proposed employment development sites are set out in Table 24.
 

Table 24 - Sandwell Employment Development Allocations

BCP Site Ref / Location - (Sandwell Central Growth Area (SCGA))

Previous Local Plan Allocation (replaced unless stated)

Site Name and Address

Appropriate Uses

Indicative Development Capacity (ha employment land)

Gross Site area (ha)

Anticipated Delivery Timescale

Further Information

SAE246

Whiteland

Whitehall Road, Tipton

Employment

5.3

5.3

2039

 

SAE176

Housing

Coneygree, Newcomen Drive, Tipton

Employment

6.9

6.9

2030

 

SAE329

Employment (Not replaced)

Land adjacent to M5 J2, Oldbury

Employment

1.12

1.12

2030

 

SAE200

Employment (Not replaced)

Land adjacent to Asda, Wolverhampton Road Oldbury

Employment

1.6

1.6

2030

 

SAE158

Employment/Mixed Use

Severn Trent land off Roway Lane, Oldbury

Employment

3.4

3.4

2030

 

SAE253

Employment (not replaced)

Rounds Green Road / Shidas Lane, Oldbury

Employment

2.9

2.9

2026

 

SAE261

Housing

British Gas, land off Dudley Rd, Oldbury

Employment

1.1

1.1

2039

 

SAE258

Housing

Legacy 43, Ryder Street, West Bromwich

Employment

0.9

0.9

2039

 

SAE256

Employment (Not replaced)

Site off Bilport Lane, Wednesbury

Employment

5.29

5.29

2039

 


 

Strategic Waste Sites

B.39 The existing strategic sites, identified on the Waste Diagram and listed in Table 25, are the significant waste management facilities operating in the Black Country. They have been identified through a detailed analysis of all known licenced and exempt facilities in each authority area. Under Policy W2, the four Local Authorities will safeguard all existing strategic and other waste management facilities from inappropriate development, in order to maintain existing levels of waste management capacity and meet Strategic Objective 13.
 

Table 25 - Sandwell Strategic Waste Sites

Site Ref

Site

Authority

Operational Capacity (tpa)

Municipal Waste Recovery – Supporting Infrastructure

WS07

Eagle Recovery and Transfer Hub

Sandwell

140,000

WS08

Sandwell HWRC (Shidas Lane)

Sandwell

20,000

Waste Disposal Installations (1)

WS17

Edwin Richards Landfill

Sandwell

250,000

9,171,000[6]

Significant Hazardous Waste Treatment Infrastructure

WS19

Wednesbury Treatment Centre

Sandwell

40,000

Significant Metal Recycling Sites (MRSs)

WS23

Alutrade

Sandwell

24,000

WS24

Cradley Metal Recycling Centre

Sandwell

165,000

WS25

ELG CSR Depot (Rowley Regis) [1]

Sandwell

20,000

WS26

EMR Smethwick

Sandwell

60,000

WS27

Sims MRS Smethwick (Rabone Lane)

Sandwell

200,000

WS28

Sims MRS Smethwick (Unit 60 Anne Road)

Sandwell

20,000

Other Significant Waste Management Infrastructure

WS36

Arrow Recycling

Sandwell

22,000

WS37

Bescot LDC, Bescot Sidings

Sandwell

150,000

WS38

Biffa Tipton WTS

Sandwell

65,000

WS39

Bull Lane Works WTS

Sandwell

200,000

WS40

Edwin Richards Inert Recycling and Soil Treatment Facility

Sandwell

75,000

WS41

Envira Recycling

Sandwell

50,000

WS42

Giffords Recycling

Sandwell

20,000

WS43

Jayplas

Sandwell

70,000

WS44

Metal & Waste Recycling (Cox's Lane)

Sandwell

25,000

WS45

ELG CSR Depot

Sandwell

75,000

WS46

Trinity Street MRF

Sandwell

60,000

WS47

Union Road Inert Waste Recycling Facility

Sandwell

40,000

WS48

Wednesbury Aggregates Recycling Facility

Sandwell

35,000

[1] Operational in 2018 but currently (April 2020) 'mothballed.'

Sources: Environment Agency: Waste Data Interrogator (WDI) 2007 – 2018, Operational Incinerators, 2018, Public Register, Remaining Landfill Capacity in England as at end of 2018 Version 2.

 

Preferred Areas for New Waste Facilities

B.40 A number of employment areas have been identified in the Black Country Waste Study (BCWS) as being most suited to the development of new waste recovery, treatment and transfer infrastructure. In Sandwell, they are the sites contained in table 26. Under Policy W3, these areas are considered least likely to give rise to land use conflicts, and in several cases, there is already co-location of existing waste facilities to which new sites would contribute.
 

Table 26 - Sandwell Preferred Areas for new Waste Facilities

Site Ref

Address

Potentially Suitable Waste Use [1]

Area

WPSa1

Cornwall Road and Parkrose Industrial Estates, Soho

Energy from waste treatment, in-vessel composting, anaerobic digestion, transfer, recycling

60.1

WPSa2

Tat Bank, Langley

Energy from waste treatment, in-vessel composting, anaerobic digestion, transfer, recycling

53.1

WPSa3

Charles Street Enterprise Park, Queens Court Trading Estate, Swan Village

Treatment, in-vessel composting, anaerobic digestion, transfer, recycling

42.7

WPSa4

Hill Top and Bilport Lane Industrial Estates, Wednesbury

Treatment, in-vessel composting, anaerobic digestion, transfer, recycling

19.9

WPSa5

Powke Lane and Waterfall Lane Trading Estates, Rowley Regis

Treatment, in-vessel composting, anaerobic digestion, transfer, recycling

46.1

WPSa6

Dartmouth Road

n/a

26.2

1 As indicated in the Black Country Waste Study, Wood 2020
 

Minerals

B.41 The Black Country Minerals Study (BCMS, Tables 12.9 and 12.10) lists all known existing mineral sites and mineral infrastructure sites in the Black Country. Existing mineral sites within the Black Country include permitted mineral extraction sites, stockpiles, brick and tile works, and a pot clay factory.

B.42 Existing Black Country mineral infrastructure sites include secondary / recycled aggregates production, rail-linked aggregates depots, coating plants, ready-mix (RMX) concrete batching plants, manufacture of concrete products, and dry silo mortar (DSM) plants.

B.43 Under Policy MIN2 (Minerals Safeguarding Areas, MSAs), the BCA will safeguard all existing mineral sites and mineral infrastructure sites from inappropriate development – this being necessary in order to retain existing capacity, and thereby helping to make best use of and conserve the Black Country's finite mineral resources and meet Strategic Objective 13.

B.44 The locations of these Black Country mineral sites and mineral infrastructure sites are identified on the Minerals Key Diagram, and those sites located within Sandwell Borough are listed in the following tables:
 

Table 27 - Sandwell Key Mineral Infrastructure

Site Ref

Site

Location

Type

MIS1

Anytime Concrete

Gerard House, Kelvin Way, West Bromwich

Concrete batching plant

MIS2

Bescot LDC - Rail Ballast Facility

Land at Bescot Sidings, off Sandy Lane, Wednesbury

Rail-related aggregates depot/ Aggregates recycling

MIS3

Breedon Oldbury Concrete Plant

Engine Street, Oldbury

Aggregates recycling

MIS4

Breedon Oldbury Concrete Plant

Cemex House, Wolverhampton Road, Oldbury

Concrete batching plant

MIS5

Former Hanson Site (West Bromwich)

Grice Street, West Bromwich

Aggregates recycling

MIS6

Hanson Ready Mixed Concrete Plant

Roway Lane, Oldbury

Concrete batching plant

MIS7

Wednesbury Asphalt Plant

Smith Road, Wednesbury

Coating plant

MIS8

Cradley Special Brick

Corngreaves Trading Estate, Overend Road, Cradley Heat

Brickworks

MIS9

Oldfields Inert Recycling Facility

Oldfields, Off Corngreaves Road, Cradley Heath

Aggregates recycling


 

Table 28 - Sandwell changes to existing Local Plan designations (Waste and Minerals)

Local Plan Document

Designation / Site Reference

Site Name

Description of Change

Reason for Change

BCCS (also mapped in the DBDS)

MSA (BCCS Policy MIN1)

Mineral Safeguarding Area (covers almost the whole of the Black Country)

Removed

Replaced in the draft BCP by more tightly defined MSAs in Walsall Borough

 

 

Table 29 - Sandwell changes to existing housing allocations

Allocation Ref

Site Ref

Old SAD Ref

Address

Site Area (ha)

Est. Capacity

proposed use

H8.3

2929

 

Site on corner of New Street, Hill Top, West Bromwich

1.11

allocated as both community open space and housing

propose to delete the housing allocation and retain the community open space allocation.

H9.7

1401

801

Bell Street / Dudley Road, Tipton

0.62

20

employment

H9.6

1448

81

Station Street, Tipton

1.37

43

employment

H13.8

1461

665 80 and 82

Waterfall Lane & 101-126 Station Rd

0.34

8

employment

HOC11

2232

263

United Steels Ltd, Upper Church Lane Tipton

1.58

73

employment

H12.8

2372

121

Rabone Lane, Smethwick

5.98

209

employment

WBPr30

2381

 

Bus Depot

1.1

68

employment

WBPr31

2384

 

Oldbury Road

16.8

588

employment

WBPr32

2385

 

Brandon Way / Albion Road (North)

6.2

248

employment

WBPr33

2386

 

Brandon Way / Albion Road (South)

1.5

494

employment

WBPr34

2387

 

Brandon Way / Brandon Close

1

43

employment

WBPr38

2389

 

Church Lane / Gladstone Street

2.8

111

employment

H9.5

2463

150 / 856

Coneygre

7.61

300

employment

H8.5

2906

15

Darlaston Road/ Old Park Road, Kings Hill, Wednesbury

5.2

200

employment

H8.4

2907

34

Holloway Bank, Wednesbury

5.71

149

employment

H8.4

2911

334

Mounts Road, Wednesbury

1.1

39

employment

H8.2

2916

553

Whitehall Industrial Estate, Whitehall Road, Great Bridge

2.51

65

employment

H8.2

2917

555

Land between Whitehall Road and Walsall Canal, Great Bridge

0.75

23

employment

H8.1

2920

634

Land to north and west of Ridgacre Road

1.63

51

employment

H8.5

2921

642

Kings Hill Trading Estate, Darlaston Road, Wednesbury

3.28

86

employment

H8.5

2922

643

Old Park Trading Estate site on Old Park Road, Wednesbury

2.62

68

employment

H8.1

2923

654

Land to the south of Ridgacre Road, West Bromwich

1.11

35

employment

H8.1

2924

657

Church Lane, West Bromwich

0.75

24

employment

H8.4

2925

788

Site off Mount Road Wednesbury

0.49

17

employment

H8.4

2926

791

Corner of Bridge Street and Mounts Road, Wednesbury

3.15

110

employment

H8.4

2927

795

Site on corner of Woden Rd South and Bridge St, Wednesbury

1.61

56

employment

H9.1

2935

966

Wellman Robey Ltd, Newfield Road, Oldbury

4.91

129

employment

H9.4

2936

1239

CBF LTD, Wade Building Services, Groveland Road, Oldbury

1.26

40

employment

H9.5

2937

151

Fisher Street / Coneygre Road, Tipton

1.7

60

employment

H9.7

2938

265

Castle Street, Tipton

1.49

47

employment

H9.5

2943

878

Coneygre Road / Burnt Tree, Tipton

1.11

35

employment

H9.1

2944

967

Birmingham Board Co Ltd, Dudley Road East, Oldbury

1

32

employment

H9.1

2945

968

Beswick Paper, Dudley Road, Oldbury

0.96

33

employment

H9.1

2949

1196

British Gas Plc, Land off Dudley Road, Oldbury

1.04

33

employment

H9.4

2950

1240

Land adjacent to Cleton Business Park, Tipton Road, Tipton

0.56

18

employment

H9.4

2951

-

Vaughan Trading Estate

19.92

349

employment

(834)

2953

 

Sedgley Road West, High Street, Tipton

1.12

39

employment

(145)

2955

 

Unit 1, Groveland Road

0.36

13

employment

(147)

2956

 

Upper Chapel Street / Brittania Street / 70 - 74 Dudley Road West

0.63

22

employment

(148)

2957

 

Dudley Road / 28 Dudley Road West

1.78

62

employment

(149)

2958

 

Tipton Road, Oldbury

1.76

62

employment

(247)

2960

 

Diamond Buses, Hallbridge Way, Oldbury

3.13

110

employment

(248)

2963

 

Groveland Road

1.18

41

employment

(578)

2965

 

Land between Great Bridge Street and William Street, Tipton

1.92

67

employment

(300)

2966

 

Alexandra Industrial Estate, Locarno Road / Alexandra Road, Tipton

2.2

77

employment

(911)

2967

 

Black Country Park, Great Bridge Street, Great Bridge

2.18

76

employment

(375) Post 2021

2969

 

Dudley Road West, Oldbury

0.46

16

employment

(836)

2971

 

Hurst Lane / Birmingham Canal / Sedgley Road, West Tipton

2.19

77

employment

(144)

2973

 

Burnt Tree Industrial Estate, Groveland Road

0.82

29

employment

WBPr36

2975

 

Swan Village Industrial Estate, West Bromwich

0.8

25

employment

H12.6

2990

200

Fitzgerald Lighting Ltd, Rood End Road

1.39

44

employment

H12.7

2994

854

Oldbury Road Industrial Estate

0.57

18

employment

H13.5

3004

259 / 896

Newlyn Road

3.37

103

employment

H13.2

3010

1301

Corngreaves Road

2.8

98

employment

(789)

3013

 

JAS Industrial Park, Titford Lane, Oldbury

0.93

33

employment

(855)

3014

 

Oldbury Road, Oldbury

2.89

102

employment

(1130)

3016

 

230 Oldbury Road

1.48

52

employment

H13.8

3017

284

Sandwell MBC Depot and surrounds, Waterfall Lane, Cradley Heath

1.36

43

employment

3019

3019

 

Station Road (South), Rowley Regis

0.85

30

employment

H13.8

3020

656

Broadcott and Broadway Industrial Estates

1.49

47

employment

H13.4

3026

268

Station Street / Graingers Lane

1.3

41

employment

H13.4

3027

280

Bridge Trading Estate

0.57

19

employment

H13.5

3032

260

Oldfields

1.64

51

employment

H13.6

3034

933

Foxoak Street, Newtown Lane, Providence Street

4.82

168

employment

H13.7

3043

297

Station Road

3.21

84

employment

(724)

3140

 

Land at Dolton Way, between Factory Road, Bloomfield Road and railway line, Tipton.

2.62

99

employment

H13.5

3142

1302

Spinners End

0.71

25

employment

H16.2

3219

753

Bloomfield Road / Barnfield Road

0.83

26

employment

H16.3

3221

842

Bloomfield Road / Fountain Lane

1.5

53

employment

H13.6

3226

1303

Bank Street, Cradley Heath (west of Kimber Drop Forgings site)

1.3

41

employment

H9.8

3398

302

Alexandra Road / Upper Church Lane / Locarno Road, Tipton

10.43

142

employment

 

5129

 

Portway Road, Wednesbury

10.7

375

employment

 

5139

 

Brymill Industrial Estate, Brown Lion Street, Tipton

1.98

69

employment

 

5265

 

Phase 9, The Parkway, site between Stafford Street, Victoria Street and Potters Lane, Wednesbury

0.94

33

employment

 

5450

 

Barnfield Trading Estate Tipton

2.24

78

employment

 

5551

 

Ridgacre Enterprise Park, Ridgacre Road, West Bromwich

0.8

28

employment

 

5553

 

Rimstock Plc, Ridgacre Road, Black Lake, West Bromwich

1.05

37

employment

 

5556

 

Vector Industrial Park, Church Lane, West Bromwich

5.2

182

employment

 

5623

 

Brook Street Business Centre, Brook Street Community Centre, 196- 200 Bloomfield Road.

1.5

53

employment

 

5641

 

Site between Great Western Street and Potters Lane, Wednesbury

1.14

49

employment

 

5642

 

Land between Potters Lane and Stafford Street Wednesbury

0.85

30

employment

 

5646

 

Site on Stafford Street, Wednesbury

1.45

51

employment

 

5648

 

Land at Potters Lane, Wednesbury

0.74

26

employment

 

5972

 

Former Corus Premises, Bloomfield Road, Tipton

0.56

20

employment

 

5138

 

Nicholls Road, Tipton

3.96

139

White land – EMP4

H9.5

354

91

Park Lane West (South Staffs Depot), Tipton

2.95

77

White land – EMP4

H9.5

6109

80

Groveland Road, Dudley Port, Tipton

0.11

7

White land

H9.7

265

93

Old Cross Street, Tipton

0.48

14

white land

H9.5

440

89

Orchard Street, Burnt Tree, Tipton

0.28

30

white land

H12.5

585

466

Flash Road / Broadwell Road, Oldbury

0.68

5 (36)

white land

HOC18

841

431

Wilson Road / Sycamore Road Smethwick

1.07

37

white land

H13.6

1436

71

St. Anne's Road, Cradley Heath

1.13

36

white land

WBPr37

1440

 

John Street North

0.49

18

white land

H8.1

1443

51

Cardigan Close / Sussex Avenue

0.14

5

white land

H12.7

1446

482

Holly Lane, Smethwick

0.53

29

white land

H12.6

1698

614

Land adjacent to 88 Wellesley Road

0.26

9

white land

H12.3

1919

1032

Former Starlight Auto Sales, Wolverhampton Road

0.23

14

white land

H12.10

1997

1037

Tudor Works, 36A Windmill Lane

0.25

24

white land

HOC9

2085

1047

Brunswick Park Trading Estate, Wednesbury

0.36

42

white land

H16.1

2227

756

Factory Road

0.44

35

white land

H13.9

2259

1071

Sentine Plastics Ltd, Wrights Lane

0.17

13

white land – EMP4

HOC11

2368

262

Summerhill Primary School, Central Avenue, Tipton

1.09

40

white land

H16.5

2370

303

Bradleys Lane / High Street

0.38

13

white land – EMP4

H12.7

2423

210

Churchill Road, Smethwick

0.5

60

white land

H8.7

2910

269

Leabrook Road / Willingsworth Road, Tipton

0.37

13

white land – EMP4

H8.2

2913

439

Sheepwash Lane / Whitehall Road, Great Bridge

0.08

3

white land

H8.2

2915

550

Land between Tinsley Street and Whitehall Road, Tipton

0.28

10

white land – EMP4

H8.1

2930

804

Pembroke Way, Hateley Heath, West Bromwich

2.3

81

white land

H8.2

2931

1120

Garage on Whitehall Road, Great Bridge, Tipton

0.14

5

white land

H8.2

2932

1121

Old Inn site, Sheepwash Lane, Great Bridge, Tipton

0.04

1

white land

H8.7

2933

45

Bannister Road, Wednesbury

2.22

76

white land

H8.8

2934

154

Site on New Road, Great Bridge inc St Lukes Centre

0.4

14

white land

H9.7

2942

779

Castle Street / High Street, Tipton

0.7

23

white land

H9.9

2947

1117

Railway Street, Horseley Heath, Tipton

0.35

12

white land – EMP4

H9.9

2948

1119

Salem Street, Great Bridge, Tipton

0.32

11

white land

(765)

2952

 

Lower Church Lane, Tipton

0.38

13

white land

(146)

2974

 

88-90 Dudley Road West

0.37

13

white land

H12.4

2980

109

Clay Lane, Oldbury

0.28

12

white land – EMP4

HOC13

2982

40

Tippity Green, Hawes Lane, Rowley Regis

1.13

40

white land

HOC13

2983

1135

Allsops Hill Rowley Regis

0.38

13

white land

HOC13

2984

1282

Land at Tippity Green, Rowley Regis

4.47

150

white land

H12.1

2987

5

Wolverhampton Road and Anvil Drive, Oldbury

0.31

9

white land – EMP4

H12.10

2997

123

Cape Hill / Durban Road

2.97

94

white land

(205)

2999

 

South Road / Broomfield, Smethwick

0.27

10

white land

(1129)

3015

 

104-110 Oldbury Road, Smethwick

0.68

24

white land

H13.4

3029

587

Cradley Road (West)

0.99

33

white land

H13.4

3031

1124

Cradley Road (East)

0.41

12

white land

H13.11

3044

613

High Street, Blackheath

0.35

12

white land

HOC3

3048

1014

Land at Newton Road, Great Barr

0.2

16

white land

H16.5

3141

863

Batmanshill Road / Hobart Road

0.25

8

white land

 

3223

 

Summerton Road

0.52

18

white land

H9.2

3224

310

10 - 60 Dudley Road East, Oldbury

2.00

70

white land – EMP4

H13.6

3225

217

Foxoak Street / St Annes Road (Kawasaki Garage)

0.4

14

white land

H12.10

3462

122

Unett Street / Raglan Road

4.6

81

white land

H13.3

3467

586

Chester Road

2.38

10

white land

 

5301

 

Potters Lane / Great Western Street, Wednesbury

0.19

6

white land – EMP4

 

5381

 

Victoria Street / Albert Street, Wednesbury

0.19

7

white land – EMP4

 

5643

 

Site between Dudley Street and Victoria St Wednesbury

1.18

41

white land – EMP4

 

6206

 

West Cross Centre. Oldbury Road / Mallin Street, Smethwick

1.06

37

white land

     

Dudley Road East / Brades Road, Oldbury

3.76

 

white land – EMP4

     

Zion Street, Tipton

2.43

 

white land – EMP4

     

70-74 Crankhall Lane

1.78

 

white land – EMP4

 

 

C. Walsall

Introduction

C.1 Walsall has an estimated population of 285,500 people[7], comprised of approximately: -

  • 21.7% children between 0-15,
  • 60.7% working-aged between 16-64, and
  • 17.6% 65 years and over.
    1. The population has seen a 7.8% increase over the past decade, up from 264,800 in 2009. Most of this increase has been in people aged under 16 and over 65; both groups have seen approximately 12% increases. This is in contrast to a working age population (16-64 years) increase of around 5%. Walsall is expected to see continued and consistent population growth of 7% to an estimated 304,400 people by 2030 and by a further 13% to an estimated 320,400 by 2040.
    2. Walsall's economy has an annual output of £4.77 billion and provides around 120,000 jobs. The local economy supports a steadily increasing resident population of over a quarter of a million people, with three in every five people being of working age. However, only two-thirds of working-age residents are in employment, and for those in work, earnings are below the national average while testing economic conditions prevail.[8]

Walsall town centre is at the heart of the borough, while there are second-tier district centres in Bloxwich, Brownhills, Willenhall, Darlaston and Aldridge. These district centres are supported by smaller centres and settlements across the borough.

C.4 Walsall can be defined by two main character areas based on its geology, the mineral resources from which drove Walsall's industrial past. The west and central part is a legacy of the Industrial Revolution, a largely urban area rich in coal and limestone and an area that has experienced changing economic prosperity, significant areas of ground contamination and abandoned infrastructure. The east remains largely rural, with open landscapes, agricultural land and woodland, but also with areas of 20th century housing and industry, including active quarries and brickworks.

C.5 Much of the urban area has been regenerated in recent decades, with new homes and industry provided on formerly derelict land. The development opportunities that remain present significant challenges because of the cost of addressing contamination and ground instability. Some former industrial land is also now of value for nature conservation and as open space. The total supply of land that might be available in the urban area to meet future need for homes and jobs is therefore limited. In order to ensure that sufficient new homes and employment remain available, the opportunity to review both open space within the urban area and also land in the Green Belt was taken during the preparation of the BCP.

C.6 Strategic opportunities for employment are focused on previously-developed sites that have complex ground mitigation requirements, and which already provide the sustainable transport infrastructure required for such uses, together with a small number of greenfield sites on the edge of the urban area that have good highway access, and which relate to existing employment areas. The opportunities for large housing sites are focussed on the edge of existing urban settlements, to ensure sustainable linked neighbourhoods are created.
 

The Strategy

C.7 The vision for Walsall Council is set out in the Corporate Plan. This states that

" We are led by the communities we serve who help shape the services we provide, and we help those communities to make a positive difference to their own lives through active civic engagement and co-operation [so that] Inequalities are reduced and all potential is maximised."[9]

C.8 In the future, Walsall will be a more confident place, with renewed investment in key infrastructure and key centres, greater opportunities for work and leisure and an affordable, accessible housing stock.

C.9 The Corporate Plan sets out the Council's priorities, which include:

  • Creating an environment where business invests and everyone who wants a job can access one.
  • People live a good quality of life and feel that they belong.
  • Children thrive emotionally, physically, mentally and feel they are achieving their potential.
  • Housing meeting all peoples' needs, is affordable, safe and warm.

C.10 The BCP will help to deliver these priorities through:

  • economic growth for all people, communities and business
  • Adaptable and diversified urban centres that increasingly support a range of residential, leisure and community uses to support and enhance the retail function.
  • housing to meet the needs of everyone in the community, to be concentrated in sustainable areas to ensure that their housing needs are met, that they can integrate with the existing urban area to ensure a strong sense of belonging and cohesion and so that they can contribute to and benefit from existing services and public space;
  • new large edge-of-urban residential sites in sustainable locations with good accessibility, supported by access to health and education services, which will include the necessary environmental protection and enhancement measures to address environmental challenges now and into the future;
  • strategic and other waste management facilities and identify suitable new facilities to ensure continued economic growth and to ensure waste management is sufficient to protect the needs of communities.
     
Delivering the Strategy

C.11 Most development is carried out by the private sector through the delivery of planning permissions. The strategy and the BCP will guide investment decisions through the determination of planning applications and the delivery of financial and other support by the local authority and other public bodies where necessary. As well as the policies and site allocations in the BCP, the strategy is supported by the policies that will be saved in the existing development plan documents:

  • Walsall Town Centre Area Action Plan (2019)
  • Walsall Site Allocations Document (SAD) (2019) most of the allocations in the SAD are 'carried forward' into the BCP and are listed in this chapter)
  • "saved" policies of the Walsall Unitary Development Plan (2005)
     

Development Allocations

C.12 The sites listed below and shown on the Policies Map are allocated for the stated uses and are subject to the listed policies. The sites are of three types; land for housing development, land for travellers and land for employment development (industry and warehousing). A small number of these allocations are of strategic significance to the delivery of the Plan because of their size, either individually or in combination with adjoining allocations. Each strategic allocation has a specific Policy applying to it, providing details of the particular constraints and requirements affecting development, which should be read alongside the information for the allocation provided in Table 31.

C.13 Most existing allocations in Walsall's Site Allocation Document are 'carried forward' into the Plan, except where sites have been developed or in a small number of cases the allocated use is no longer considered to be appropriate. These carried-forward allocations are listed separately for clarity in the tables below but are also subject to the listed policy(ies) in the Plan. In some cases, the precise site boundaries and site reference numbers have changed from those in the SAD. In the adopted version of the Plan, the 'newly allocated' and 'carried forward' sites will be listed together and will have equal status.

C.14 The policies of the BCP will safeguard various existing land uses and designations. Occupied employment land will be safeguarded by policies EMP2, EMP3 and EMP4. Sites that are safeguarded by these policies are not listed individually below but are shown on the Policies Map. In the case of sites in Walsall, occupied employment land is currently safeguarded by the SAD and most of this land will be carried forward to the BCP, although the categories of some sites (local or strategic quality) will change.

C.15 The Plan will not allocate sites in Walsall Strategic Centre and this area will remain subject to the Town Centre Area Action Plan. However, some of the targets, in particular for housing, office and retail uses, are based on provision to be made in the Strategic Centre. Details are set out in the chapters for these topics.

C.16 The sites listed in this appendix can be viewed in detail on the online Policies Map.
 

Figure 19 - Walsall Spatial Plan

Figure 19 - Walsall Spatial Plan


Figure 20 - Walsall strategic centre and AAP boundary

Figure 20 - Walsall strategic centre and AAP boundary

 

General Spatial Strategy

C.17 Policy CSP1 describes the development strategy for the Black Country as a whole, with growth and regeneration focussed into the Strategic Centres and Core Regeneration Areas as outlined in policy CSP2. Outside these locations, policy CSP3 states that the quality of the Existing Neighbourhood Areas will be protected and enhanced, and a limited number of Neighbourhood Growth Areas in highly sustainable locations on the edge of the Urban Areas will be delivered. These areas in Walsall are described below.
 

Walsall Strategic Centre

C.18 Walsall Strategic Centre is the administrative, commercial and cultural heart of the borough. It is the focus for a wide range of civic, retail, cultural and leisure functions, including being home to the Town Hall and Civic Centre, County and Magistrates Courts, Walsall College, Waterfront, Crown Wharf and the New Art Gallery. The location is highly accessible by public transport, through the provision of increasingly well-integrated rail and bus services. It lies at the centre of the Walsall to Wolverhampton Core Growth Area.

C.19 In the context of this strategy, and the evidence and opportunities outlined above, the priority for Walsall Town Centre for 2039 is to become a diversified, repurposed and rejuvenated strategic centre, providing a focus for a well-balanced mix of commercial, business, service and community uses spanning the daytime and nigh-time economy. Changing shopping patterns and challenges to the high street will be addressed through increased flexibility, facilitating the consolidation of the shopping core and opening space up to new uses, flexible models of operation and reducing vacancies., This flexibility in the shopping core will be complemented by surrounding office and leisure-led mixed uses, and supported by maximising residential provision in all locations (including the use of upper floors) and with it the services, community functions and educational amenity and accessibility that residents need. The character and quality of the town centre's built and natural environment will be improved to make the town centre a sustainable, healthy and attractive place to shop, live, work and visit.

C.20 The existing strategy for the strategic centre compromises the Unitary Development Plan (2005) and Area Action Plan (AAP) (2019). The UDP, while largely superseded by subsequent Development Plan Documents (including the Black Country Core Strategy and the Walsall Site Allocations Document), still contains saved policies that apply to the Strategic Centre of Walsall, namely Part 1 5.4 - 5.11, Part 2 5.12 - 5.24, Policy S1, Policy S2, Policy S3, Policy S4 and affects developments outside of centres through saved paragraphs and policies 5.41, Policy S6, Policy S7 as well as other general centres Policies S8 - S17. The AAP identifies several areas for investment and targeted use, including St Matthew's Quarter, Walsall Gigaport, Walsall Waterfront and Park Street Shopping Core, with an associated set of policies and proposals for each one. All AAP policies are relevant to proposals within the BCP boundary of Walsall Strategic Centre.
 

District Centre

C.21 Walsall has five District Centres, Aldridge, Bloxwich, Brownhills, Darlaston and Willenhall, as outlined in BCP Policy CEN1. The district centres serve more localised roles, providing substantial retail, leisure and services to a wide area. Their main role is to meet the needs of their districts for convenience goods, local services and community facilities, although they all have some importance for comparison shopping and in accommodating facilities of Borough-wide importance which cannot be located in Walsall Town Centre.

C.22 The priority for District Centres in 2039 will be to help drive forward the growth and regeneration of the borough outside of the strategic centre as a hub for their respective district areas, providing an enhanced level of town centres uses and services for residents in the district while strengthening connections to the town centre and the outlying local centres and residential areas on the urban fringe. District Centres will be more adaptable and flexible, accommodating housing provision where possible to improve vibrancy and the health of the centre, and offer the most sustainable areas well served by public transport links and a wide array of uses and services. Darlaston and Willenhall lie within the Walsall to Wolverhampton Core Growth Area: they will serve as centres for targeted investment in infrastructure delivery and employment land to help deliver strengthened links between the Black Country's strategic centres. Aldridge, Bloxwich and Brownhills will serve nearby Neighbourhood Growth Areas.
 

Local Centres

C.23 Walsall has 34 local centres as listed in BCP Policy CEN1. This network of vibrant Local Centres provides particularly for day-to-day convenience shopping and service needs both within the Core Regeneration Areas and Existing Neighbourhood Areas. Within these areas the retention, enhancement and further development of shops, services and other town centre uses is the key aim, with housing supported where it can complement and not prejudice the main town centre uses. Local centres are important to the vitality of Walsall. These centres generally meet day-today convenience goods needs and are especially useful to the elderly and less mobile. They also provide a focal point for the communities within Walsall and are an important part of the Borough's character.

C.24 The priority for Local Centres in 2039 is their protection from the loss of provision to the communities that rely on them, ensuring retention of a good level of access to local convenience and comparison retail, services, community facilities and other amenities. Improved connections through the Neighbourhood Growth Areas will ensure communities continue to be sustainable, with a range of services to support residents' local needs.

C.25 The existing strategy for Local Centres includes the SAD, which outlines policies and allocations for all areas in Walsall outside of the strategic centre and district centres, namely SLC1 and SLC2 which detail plans to strengthen Local Centres.
 

Walsall to Wolverhampton Core Growth Area

C.26 The Walsall to Wolverhampton Core Regeneration Area is based around the road, rail and waterway corridor, with the Black Country Route linked to M6 Junction 10, the re-opened railway stations at Darlaston and Willenhall, and the Wyrley and Essington Canal which provides a pedestrian, cycle and leisure route from Birchills, through Walsall Strategic Centre, Phoenix 10 and Darlaston to Moxley. Much regeneration has already taken place in this area, and many new homes and jobs are expected to be delivered in the future at key locations such as Phoenix 10, Bentley Lane, Moxley Tip and in Willenhall Town Centre. The Core Regeneration Area will continue to be the focus of public sector investment to regenerate brownfield sites.
 

Existing Neighbourhood Areas

C.27 Outside the strategic centre and growth areas, existing commitments for new homes and employment will continue to be delivered. The neighbourhood areas provide a network of sustainable residential areas, including some new housing sites of medium size, as well as clusters of employment areas, a network of green infrastructure and community facilities, with seamless links to the strategic centres, Core Regeneration Areas and the Green Belt. It is also expected that small scale housing developments will continue to come forward in the neighbourhood areas as windfalls.
 

Neighbourhood Growth Areas

C.28 The existing growth network does not have the capacity to accommodate all our need for new homes and jobs. It is also important to safeguard the character of the existing neighbourhood areas, which are often low to medium density housing with good quality open space. A number of Neighbourhood Growth Areas are therefore proposed in sustainable locations close to the existing urban area that have good access to services. These areas will provide for additional homes and jobs to meet the needs of our residents. They will also provide for new or enhanced services where necessary, and in most cases, developers will be required to enhance biodiversity through the provision of new areas for wildlife and the restoration of existing ones.
 

Green Belt

C.29 Policy CSP3 states that a strong Green Belt will continue to be retained to promote urban renaissance and to provide easy access to the countryside for urban residents where the landscape, nature conservation and agricultural land will be protected and enhanced. Walsall contains the bulk of Green Belt land in the Black Country, compromising over one third of the borough. Walsall's Green Belt is mainly agricultural.
 

Growth Targets

Table 30 - Walsall growth targets for housing and employment land allocations

Location

Housing (net homes)

Employment Land allocations

Neighbourhood Growth Areas

5,418 (to 2039)

36ha

Core Regeneration Area

2,126

88ha

Walsall Strategic Centre

1,168

n/a

Towns and Neighbourhood Areas

3,177

40ha

Windfalls

1,455

n/a

Total

13,344

164ha

 

C.30 The figures in this table are the numbers that are expected to be capable of delivery during the period of the plan. Proposals that will result in the numbers of homes or employment land exceeding the figures will be supported where they are in accordance with the other policies of the development plan.
 

Table 31 - Walsall Sites Allocated for Housing by Black Country Plan (policy HOU1)

Site Ref

Policy in Previous Local Plan

Site Name and Address

Growth Area

Indicative Housing Capacity

Gross Site area (ha)

Indicative net developable area (ha)

Net Density (dph)

Anticipated Delivery Timescale

Further Information

WAH230

GB1

Land on the east side of Chester Road, Aldridge

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

66

5.09

2.55

35

Between 2027-2028

See Strategic Allocation Policy WSA.9.

WAH231

GB1

Land off Sutton Road, Longwood Lane, Walsall

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

202

11.9

7.74

35

Between 2027-2031

See Strategic Allocation Policy WSA.6.

WAH232

GB1

Yieldsfield Farm (sometimes recorded as Yieldfields farm), Stafford Road, Bloxwich

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

978

39.55

37.26

35

600 by 2039

See Strategic Allocation Policy WSA.4.

WAH233

GB1

Middlemore Lane West, Aldridge

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

35

1.35

1.35

35

By 2027

A strategy for landscape and ecology that ensures the retention and / or mitigation for established trees. Footpath improvements along Middlemore Lane to provide safe and secure access routes. On-site provision or funding for off-site arrangements to improve access to a primary school and local health centre.

WAH234

GB1

Land between Queslett Road, Doe Bank Lane and Aldridge Road, Pheasey

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

1426

42.27

42.27

45

960 by 2039

See Strategic Allocation Policy WSA8.

WAH235

GB1

Home Farm, Sandhills, Walsall Wood

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

1417

54

54

35

800 by 2039

See Strategic Allocation Policy WSA1.

WAH236

GB1

Land at Yorks Bridge, Lichfield Road, Pelsall

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

580

21.41

17.21

45

Between 2027-2039

See Strategic Allocation Policy WSA5.

WAH237

GB1

Land north of Stonnall Road, Aldridge

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

363

13.82

13.82

35

Between 2027-2034

See Strategic Allocation Policy WSA3.

WAH238

GB1

Land at Vicarage Road / Coronation Road, High Heath

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

504

32.11

19.22

35

400 by 2039

See Strategic Allocation Policy WSA.2.

WAH239

GB1

Land north of Northfields Way, Clayhanger, Brownhills

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

46

1.87

1.37

45

By 2027

A satisfactory strategy for enhancement mitigation and compensation for ecology will be required.

WAH240

GB1

Land at Mob Lane, High Heath, Pelsall

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

209

7.99

7.99

35

Between 2027-2031

See Strategic Allocation Policy WSA.2.

WAH241

GB1, ENV7

Former NHS site, land east of Nether Hall Avenue, Great Barr

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

18

1.43

0.71

35

By 2025

Site access must be from Stewards Drive. Landscaping scheme to include details of tree protection and retention. The site is in a MSA and requires prior extraction where practical and environmentally feasible. Where practical and environmentally feasible prior extraction for bedrock sand and gravel, shall take place.

WAH242

GB1

Calderfields West, Aldridge Road, Walsall

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

592

22.48

18.6

35

442 by 2039

See Strategic Allocation Policy WSA.7.

WAH243

GB1

Cartbridge Lane South Open Space

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

61

1.81

1.81

45

By 2027

The site is in a MSA and requires prior extraction where practical and environmentally feasible. Where practical and environmentally feasible prior extraction for superficial sand and gravel, shall take place. On-site provision or funding for off-site arrangements to improve access to a health centre.

WAH244

OS1

Former Reedswood Golf Course

Towns and Neighbourhood Area.

94

5.6

2.8

45

Between 2027-2028

Part of reclaimed former power station. Landscaping scheme to include details of tree protection and retention.

WAH245

OS1

Former Allens Centre and Hilton Road amenity greenspace

Towns and Neighbourhood Area.

23

2.10

0.71

45

By 2025

Redundant open space. Only 0.71 ha of the submitted area to the west is allocated.

WAH246

GB1

Land to the east of Chester Road, north of Pacific Nurseries Hardwick

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

228

8.69

8.69

35

Between 2030-2034

See Strategic Allocation Policy WSA9.

WAH247

GB1

Sandfield Farm, Lichfield Road, Brownhills

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

33

1.27

1.27

35

By 2027

High quality design to provide for single storey accommodation is required. The site is in a MSA and requires prior extraction where practical and environmentally feasible. Where practical and environmentally feasible prior extraction for bedrock sand and gravel, shall take place. On-site provision or funding for off-site arrangements to improve access to a primary school and local health centre.

WAH248

GB1

Land to the northeast of Shire Oak, Lichfield Road

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

10

0.37

0.37

35

By 2027

The site is in a MSA and requires prior extraction where practical and environmentally feasible. Where practical and environmentally feasible prior extraction for bedrock and superficial sand and gravel, shall take place. Development of the site must be in conjunction with Sandfield Farm development to ensure sustainability.

WAH249

GB1

Land to the southwest of Shire Oak, Lichfield Road

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

8

0.32

0.32

35

By 2027

The site is in a MSA and requires prior extraction where practical and environmentally feasible. Where practical and environmentally feasible prior extraction for bedrock, sand and gravel will take place. Development of the site must be in conjunction with Sandfield Farm development to ensure sustainability.

WAH250

GB1

Star Service Station, Queslett Road East

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

53

0.27

0.27

45

By 2022

Former Green Belt site with planning permission for flats.

WAH251

GB1

212 Barns Farm, Barns Lane

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

112

4.26

4.26

45

Between 2027-2029

A satisfactory strategy for enhancement mitigation and or compensation for ecology which takes account of the adjacent SLINC. Investigation and remediation of contaminated land. The site is in a MSA and requires prior extraction where practical and environmentally feasible. Where practical and environmentally feasible prior extraction for superficial sand and gravel, brick clay shall take place. Mitigation including consideration of acceptable layout to ensure no significant amenity impacts from the operation of Atlas Quarry. On-site provision or funding for off-site arrangements to improve access to a health centre.

WAH252

GB1

The Three Crowns, Sutton Road

Towns and Neighbourhood Area.

7

0.7

0.7

35

By 2022

Brownfield site in green belt with existing planning permission. A satisfactory strategy for enhancement mitigation and or compensation for ecology.

WAH253

GB1

South of Stonnall Road

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

38

5.07

4.45

35

Between 2032-2033

Investigation and remediation of contaminated land. Footpaths required to serve the development and provision for a controlled / uncontrolled pedestrian crossing on Stonnall Road. The site is in a MSA and requires prior extraction where practical and environmentally feasible. Where practical and environmentally feasible prior extraction for bedrock sand and gravel, shall take place. On-site provision or funding for off-site arrangements to improve access to a primary school and local health centre.

WAH254

GB1

Pacific Nurseries, Chester Road, Walsall

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

121

4.65

2.09

35

Between 2029-2031

Investigation and remediation of contaminated land. Established trees worthy of protection shall be retained and could reduce the developable area. The site is in a MSA and requires prior extraction where practical and environmentally feasible. Where practical and environmentally feasible prior extraction for bedrock and superficial sand and gravel, shall take place. . On-site provision or funding for off-site arrangements to improve access to primary school, secondary school and local health centre.

WAH255

GB1

Rear of 91 Wood Lane, Streetly

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

49

2.33

1.7

35

By 2026

Established trees worthy of protection shall be retained and could reduce the developable area. The site is in a MSA and requires prior extraction where practical and environmentally feasible. Where practical and environmentally feasible prior extraction for bedrock and superficial sand and gravel, shall take place. On-site provision or funding for off-site arrangements to improve access to a primary school.

WAH256

GB1

Land to the rear of 114-130 Green Lane, Shelfield

Neighbourhood Growth Area.

37

1.91

1.41

35

By 2026

Landscaping scheme to include details of tree protection and retention. The site is in a MSA and requires prior extraction where practical and environmentally feasible. Where practical and environmentally feasible prior extraction for superficial sand and gravel, shall take place.


 

Table 32 - Walsall Sites Allocated for Housing 'Carried Forward' from Site Allocation Document

Site Ref

Policy in Previous Local Plan

Site Name and Address

Growth Area

Indicative Housing Capacity

Gross Site area (ha)

Indicative Net Developable Area (ha)

Net Density (dph)

Anticipated Delivery Timescale

Further Information

WAH001

HC1

New Road (former car showroom), Willenhall

 

9

0.27

   

by 2026

Residential development to north and south. Site may be affected by underground power cable: see National Grid / Western Power comments

WAH002

HC1

Field Street (Gilberts' Club), Willenhall

 

26

0.77

   

by 2026

Potential to enlarge UDP allocated site to include all or part of this area as part of Willenhall district centre development

WAH003

HC1

Kendrick Place and Castle View Road, Moxley

 

25

0.73

   

by 2026

Surplus Walsall Council land. Boundary amended and capacity revised to exclude area with planning permission

WAH005

HC1

Goscote Lane Copper Works, Goscote

 

263

8.76

   

by 2026

Large site in housing renewal area. Reclamation work is underway. SAD allocation is for 395 but capacity reduced to match latest planning application

WAH006

HC1

Bentley Road North (corner of King Charles Avenue), Bentley

 

23

0.34

   

by 2026

Cleared former social housing site. Potential to develop with similar site immediately to north.

WAH007

HC1

Joynson Street (site of former Kings Hill JMI School), Darlaston

 

17

0.49

   

by 2026

Surplus Walsall Council property. Planning permission for nursing home but suitable for conventional dwellings if this is not implemented. Add lapsed pp area to west

WAH008

HC1

Adjoining 15 Joynson Street, Darlaston

 

5

0.08

   

by 2026

Lapsed planning permission. Site too small to allocate by itself but lies adjacent to much larger housing sites

WAH009

HC1

Riding Way, Short Heath

 

14

0.40

   

by 2026

Part is surplus Council property. Inaccessible and little used open space

WAH010

HC1

Hatherton Liberal Club, North Street, Walsall

 

6

0.18

   

by 2026

Need to consider potential for housing in conjunction with adjoining sites

WAH011

HC1

Mill Street, (former scrap yard), Walsall

 

12

0.34

   

by 2026

Need to consider potential for housing in conjunction with adjoining sites

WAH012

HC1

Watling Street (land north of Kings Deer Road), Brownhills

 

15

0.21

   

by 2026

Vacant site adjacent to recently completed housing development.

WAH013

HC1

Poplar Avenue (east), Bentley

 

23

0.63

   

by 2026

 

WAH014

HC1

Noose Crescent (former Lakeside School), Willenhall

 

59

1.71

   

by 2026

Surplus school site owned by Walsall Council

WAH015

HC1

Rear of 16 High Road, Lane Head, Willenhall

 

29

0.84

   

by 2026

Garage and open storage area. Site lies in residential area. Housing recently completed on former church site to north-east. Site enlarged to include former site 348

WAH016

HC1

30 to 32 Hollyhedge Lane (east side)), Walsall

 

33

0.29

   

by 2026

 

WAH017

HC1

28 Hollyhedge Lane (east side) (), Walsall

 

24

0.21

   

by 2026

 

WAH018

HC1

former Bradford Coal Wharf, Hollyhedge Lane (east side) , Walsall

 

52

0.45

   

by 2026

 

WAH019

HC1

Orange Tree, 20 Wolverhampton Road, Walsall

 

4

0.03

   

by 2026

Estimated dwelling capacity based on numbers proposed in planning application 07/0196/FL/W7 divided pro-rata across application site. Suitability for residential subject to air quality being acceptable

WAH020

HC1

Former Metal Casements, Birch Street, Walsall

 

95

2.71

   

by 2026

Developability depends on treatment of limestone workings

WAH021

HC1

Hollyhedge Lane (west side), Walsall

 

14

0.39

   

by 2026

 

WAH022

HC1

Walsall Iron and Steel, Wolverhampton Road, Walsall

 

67

0.48

   

by 2026

Potential to develop in conjunction with adjoining former Harvestime

WAH023

HC1

Festival Avenue (end of street), Darlaston

 

10

0.31

   

by 2026

Surplus open space.

WAH024

HC1

Festival Avenue, Darlaston

 

24

0.68

   

by 2026

Surplus Open Space. Formerly playing field for now demolished school.

WAH025

HC1

Woodwards Road (former garage and vehicle storage yard), Walsall

 

24

0.37

   

by 2026

 

WAH026

HC1

New Invention Methodist Church, Lichfield Road, New Invention

 

14

0.42

   

by 2026

Former church in residential area.

WAH027

HC1

Allen's Centre, Hilton Road, New Invention

 

22

0.64

   

by 2026

Surplus council property. Allocation relates to building footprint only, not adjacent open space

WAH028

HC1

Essington Lodge, Essington Road, New Invention

 

23

0.66

   

by 2026

Potential surplus Walsall Council property

WAH030

HC1

60, Walsall Road, Willenhall, Walsall

 

24

0.39

   

by 2026

Lapsed planning permission for residential development. In use as car parking for adjacent temple

WAH031

HC1

1 and 2 Fletchers Lane, Willenhall

 

2

0.05

   

by 2026

allocate for housing in conjunction with adjoining sites

WAH032

HC1

3 Fletchers Lane, Willenhall

 

3

0.06

   

by 2026

Lapsed planning permission. Allocate for housing with adjoining sites

WAH033

HC1

ASK Motors, 664 Bloxwich Road, Walsall

 

20

0.15

   

by 2026

Lapsed planning permission. Site currently in use for car sales but lies in predominantly residential area

WAH034

HC1

British Lion Works, Forest Lane, Walsall

 

16

0.23

   

by 2026

capacity reduced in line with latest permission

WAH035

HC1

British Lion Works, Forest Lane, Walsall

 

3

0.07

   

by 2026

Residual area covered by SAD housing allocation. Estimated capacity based on 40dph

WAH036

HC1

Eagle Public House, Creswell Crescent, Bloxwich

 

17

0.12

   

by 2026

Lapsed planning permission for apartments. Adjacent to rail station and frequent bus service so suitable for high density residential development despite adjacent development only comprising houses

WAH040

HC1

Former Works Site c/o Cemetery Road, Villiers Street, Willenhall

 

14

0.16

   

by 2026

potential for development in conjunction with adjacent sites and as part of Willenhall district centre

WAH043

HC1

Howdles Lane / Castle Street, Brownhills

 

40

1.19

   

by 2026

Site boundary amended from UDP allocation to match boundary with Gladstone House and exclude access to Howdles Lane garages

WAH044

HC1

Gladstone House, 45 Castle Street, Brownhills

 

6

0.18

   

by 2026

Too small to allocate in SAD by itself, but add to adjoining UDP allocation site (HO168a)

WAH045

HC1

Land adjacent Bentley Green, Bentley Road North, Walsall

 

144

0.78

   

by 2026

 

WAH046

HC1

Land at Churchill Road and Kent Road, to the rear of 2-14 Kent Road and 201-205 Churchill Road, Bentley, Walsall

 

26

0.92

   

by 2026

Site boundary and housing capacity based on outline planning permission. Part of site is within SLINC. Sewer beneath part of site

WAH048

HC1

Bentley Moor Club, Bentley Drive, Walsall

 

10

0.27

   

by 2026

lapsed planning permission but site remains clear and available

WAH049

HC1

Lichfield Road, Little Bloxwich

 

10

0.29

   

by 2026

Part of UDP allocation has been developed. Remainder of site is currently in use as community transport base

WAH050

HC1

Petrol Station, 274 - 276 Lichfield Road, Willenhall

 

21

0.51

   

by 2026

Lapsed planning permission. Site remains in use as petrol station but surrounding area is residential, so this would be preferred alternative use

WAH051

HC1

Rear of Pinson Road, Willenhall

 

15

0.40

   

by 2026

Potential to enlarge site to include land to east and north as part of Willenhall district centre development

WAH053

HC1

Former Petrol Station corner of Bentley Mill Way, Wolverhampton Road West, Walsall

 

21

0.10

   

by 2026

Lapsed planning permission. Potential to be added to adjoining former Pickfords Site IN91.4 but housing in conjunction with Lane Arms PH site more feasible

WAH054

HC1

Former Lane Arms Public House, corner of Bentley Road North, Wolverhampton Road West, Walsall

 

12

0.24

   

by 2026

 

WAH055

HC1

Between 114 and 120 and 122a and 127 Watling Street/ Roman Close, Brownhills

 

10

0.29

   

by 2026

Surplus Walsall Council land.

WAH056

HC1

Cricket Close allotments and tennis courts, Walsall

 

42

1.22

   

by 2026

 

WAH057

HC1

Former Royal Navy Club, 120 Elmore Green Road, Bloxwich

 

10

0.10

   

by 2026

lapsed permission but site remains vacant and available

WAH058

HC1

Gordon House (TA Centre), Sutton Road, Walsall

 

22

0.63

   

by 2026

Potential surplus Government property

WAH059

HC1

Narrow Lane House and Neighbourhood Office Site, Narrow Lane, Walsall

 

14

0.48

   

by 2026

Surplus Walsall Council property. Boundary revised 29-03-18 following completion of junction improvement

WAH060

HC1

Pleck Working Men's Club, Pleck Road, Walsall

 

11

0.24

   

by 2026

Lapsed planning permission. Site has been cleared and in use for temporary car parking

WAH061

HC1

Royal British Legion Club, Broad Lane Gardens, Bloxwich

 

25

0.71

   

by 2026

Surplus Walsall Council property

WAH063

HC1

Former Warreners Arms, High Street, Brownhills

 

58

0.36

   

by 2026

Capacity based on planning application but this has been withdrawn

WAH065

HC1

Birway Garage, Newhall Street, Willenhall

 

28

0.33

   

by 2026

allowed on appeal 6/1/15

WAH066

HC1

Willenhall Coachcraft, 348 Wolverhampton Road West, Willenhall

 

33

0.62

   

by 2026

Long established car sales use at front of site but remainder is vacant

WAH067

HC1

Rowley View, Moxley (former nursery and open space)

 

15

0.43

   

by 2026

Former Rowley View Nursery

WAH068

HC1

Rowley View, Moxley (Former Highgate Arms)

 

11

0.17

   

by 2026

Former Highgate Arms Pub.

WAH069

HC1

Gorway Road

 

25

1.65

   

by 2026

Future of site needs to be considered in conjunction with remainder of Wolverhampton University site. Still potential for housing, but impact on woodland needs to be addressed

Table 33 - Walsall Sites Allocated for Permanent Gypsy and Traveller Sites by Black Country Plan

Policies

Site Ref

Policy in Previous Local Plan

Site Name and Address

Appropriate Uses

Indicative Development Capacity (housing and employment land)

Site area (ha)

Anticipated Delivery Timescale

Further Information

HOU4

WAGT019

GB1

56 Cartbridge Lane

Travellers

4 pitches

0.27ha

Immediate

Existing occupied site in Green Belt with temporary planning permission that lapsed in 2016

HOU4

WAGT020

GB1

34-38 Gould Firm Lane

Travellers

4 pitches

0.20ha

Immediate

Existing occupied site in Green Belt with personal permission


 

Table 34 - Walsall Sites allocated for permanent Gypsy and Traveller sites carried forward from Site Allocation Document

Policies

Site Ref

Policy in Previous Local Plan

Site Name and Address

Appropriate Uses

Indicative Development Capacity (housing and employment land)

Site area (ha)

Anticipated Delivery Timescale

Further Information

HOU4

WAGT001

HC4, GB1

Willenhall Lane Caravan Site, Willenhall Lane, Bloxwich (Former Community Room)

Travellers

2 pitches

n/a

2024

Additional pitches on existing local authority site through redevelopment of former community room

HOU4

WAGT002

HC4

Rear of 48 - 72 Foster Street, Blakenall

Travellers

3 pitches

n/a

2024

Existing allocation

HOU4

WAGT003

HC4

Dolphin Close (Goscote Site C), Goscote

Travellers

10 pitches

n/a

2024

Existing allocation on local authority owned land


 

Table 35 - Walsall Existing Traveller Sites Safeguarded for Current Use and Carried Forward from Site Allocation Document

Policies

Site Ref

Policy in Previous Local Plan

Site Name and Address

Appropriate Uses

Indicative Development Capacity (housing and employment land)

Site area (ha)

Anticipated Delivery Timescale

Further Information

HOU4

WAGT018

HC4, GB1

Willenhall Lane Caravan Site, Willenhall Lane, Bloxwich

Travellers

19 pitches

 

 

 

HOU4

WAGT005

HC4

Haywoods, Noose Lane, Willenhall

Travellers

1 pitch

     

HOU4

WAGT004

HC4

Trentham Cottage, Noose Lane, Willenhall

Travellers

11 pitches

     

HOU4

WAGT006

HC4

47A Guild Avenue, Bloxwich

Travellers

1 pitch

     

HOU4

WAGT007

HC4, GB1

Railswood Nursery, Railswood Drive, Pelsall

Travellers

1 pitch

     

HOU4

WAGT016

HC4

Adjacent 1 Croft Street, Willenhall

Travellers

1 pitch

     

HOU4

WAGT012

HC4, GB1

Bridge Farm, Goscote Lane, Bloxwich

Showpeople

12 plots

     

HOU4

WAGT011

HC4, GB1

Oak Tree Farm, Goscote Lane, Bloxwich

Showpeople

9 plots

     

HOU4

WAGT010

HC4, GB1

Goscote Lane (Storage Yard), Bloxwich

Showpeople

0 (storage area)

     

HOU4

WAGT009

HC4, GB1

Showmen's Guild Site, Goscote Lane, Bloxwich

Showpeople

20 plots

     

HOU4

WAGT013

HC4, GB1

East of Goscote Lane (Strawberry Fields), Bloxwich

Showpeople

1 plot

     

HOU4

WAGT014

HC4

Lindon Road, Brownhills

Showpeople

1 plot

     

HOU4

WAGT017

HC4

Toberland, Reaymer Close, Walsall

Showpeople

14 plots

     

HOU4

WAGT015

HC4

Charlie Swann, 110 Lindon Road, Brownhills

Showpeople

9 plots

     



Table 36 - Walsall Sites Allocated for Employment by Black Country Plan (policy EMP1)

BCP Site Ref

Policy in previous local plan

Site Name and Address

Indicative development capacity (ha employment land)

Gross site area (ha)

Anticipated delivery timescale

Further Information

WAE409

GB1

237 Watling Street, Brownhills

5.92

5.92

By 2039

Neighbourhood Growth Area

WAE404

GB1

Lynx / Beatwaste Site, Bentley Lane

11.22

11.2

By 2039

Former landfill site in green belt. Investigation and remediation of contaminated land.

WAE410

GB1

Johnsons Farm and Meadow Farm

8.41

8.41

By 2039

Neighbourhood Growth Area. Footpaths are required to serve the development along Lichfield Road and Hanney Hay Road. The site is in a MSA and requires prior extraction where practical and environmentally feasible. Where practical and environmentally feasible prior extraction for bedrock sand and gravel, shall take place.

WAE411

GB1

Land to the south east of Longwood Bridge

1.3

1.3

By 2039

Neighbourhood Growth Area adjacent to Aldridge Airport industrial area. Established trees worthy of protection shall be retained and could reduce the developable area.

WAE412

GB1

Sandown Quarry, Stubbers Green Road, Aldridge

20.85

20.85

By 2039

Currently active quarry that will need to be infilled and stabilised before development.

Landscaping scheme required in the interests of local amenities and ecology. The site is in a MSA and requires prior extraction where practical and environmentally feasible. Where practical and environmentally feasible prior extraction for superficial sand and gravel, brick clay shall take place.

Table 37 - Walsall Sites Allocated for Employment 'Carried Forward' from Site Allocation Document

BCP Site Ref

Policy in Previous Local Plan (replaced unless stated)

Site Name and Address

Indicative Development Capacity (ha employment land)

Gross Site area (ha)

Anticipated Delivery Timescale

Further Information

WAE002

IND3

Pelsall Road / Bullows Road, Brownhills

 

1.51

   

WAE005

IND2

North of Maybrook / Clayhanger Road, Brownhills

 

1.79

   

WAE004

IND3

Former scrapyard, north of Joberns Tip, Coppice Lane, Walsall Wood

 

1.91

   

WAE007

IND3

Longleat Road, Walsall Wood (south of Focus Car Park)

 

0.19

   

WAE009

IND3

Land corner of Northgate / Longleat Road, Aldridge

 

0.62

   

WAE010

IND2

Adjacent Shaylors, Anchor Industrial Park, Wharf Approach, Aldridge

 

0.95

   

WAE012

IND2

Former Aldridge Rail Sidings, Middlemore Lane, Aldridge

 

2.16

   

WAE014

IND2

Former Jack Allen Site, South of Middlemore Lane, Aldridge

 

1.87

   

WAE021

IND2

McKechnie Brass, Middlemore Lane, Aldridge

 

6.34

   

WAE017

IND3

Focus 10 (adjacent former Trident Alloys), Willenhall Lane, Bloxwich

 

5.92

   

WAE024

IND3

Fryers Road, Bloxwich

 

3.82

   

WAE018

IND3

Rear of Biasi House, opposite Mary Elliot School, Leamore Lane

 

0.55

   

WAE027

IND2

Former Calor Gas Site fronting Green Lane, Walsall

 

1.01

   

WAE041

IND2

North of Newfield Close, Walsall

 

2.19

   

WAE032

IND3

Former scrap yard, Alma Street, Walsall

 

0.51

   

WAE052

IND2

Walsall Enterprise Park West, Regal Drive, Pleck

 

0.79

   

WAE056

IND2

Adjacent to Middletons, Bescot Crescent

 

0.43

   

WAE058

IND2

Reedswood Way

 

4.02

   

WAE063

IND2

Tempus 10 North (land east of KFC, Tempus Drive)

 

1.76

   

WAE064

IND2

Tempus 10 South (land south of Village Hotel, Tempus Drive)

 

1.64

   

WAE068

IND3

Land between St. Annes Road, Monmer Lane and Sharesacre Street, Willenhall

 

2.57

   

WAE065

IND3

Adjacent Rainbow Business Park, Stringes Lane, Willenhall

 

0.45

   

WAE069

IND3

Former Ductile, Charles Street, Willenhall

 

2.59

   

WAE070

IND2

Aspray (Former George Carter Pressings), Park Road, Willenhall

 

1.24

   

WAE076

IND3

Land rear of Guardian Lock and 47 Wednesfield Road, Willenhall

 

0.39

   

WAE071

IND3

North of Watery Lane, Willenhall

 

0.63

   

WAE072

IND3

Rear of Assa Abloy, School Street, Willenhall

 

2.24

   

WAE076

IND2

Rear of 18 Rose Hill, Willenhall

 

0.3

   

WAE078

IND2

North of Westacre, Willenhall

 

0.64

   

WAE084

IND2

Central Point, Willenhall Road, Darlaston

 

1.67

   

WAE093

IND2

Axcess 10 Business Park, land adjacent Unit 401, Bentley Road South

 

1.03

   

WAE099

IND2

Heath Road / Kendricks Road, Darlaston

 

0.41

   

WAE103

IND3

Former IMI south of canal, Darlaston Road, Pleck (Phoenix 10 Site A - Part)

 

0.84

   

WAE104

IND2

Former IMI Works, Pleck (Phoenix 10 Site A - part)

 

9.45

   

WAE106

IND2

North of IMI, Pleck (Phoenix 10 Site B)

 

4.09

   

WAE105

IND2

Rear of Globe Pub, Darlaston Road, Walsall

 

2.89

   

WAE109

IND2

Box Pool Site, Darlaston Road, Walsall

 

1.67

   

WAE110

IND2

James Bridge Gasholders Site, Darlaston Road, Walsall

 

8.22

   

WAE118

IND2

Rear of Woods Bank Trading Estate, Woden Road West, Darlaston

 

1.2

   

WAE120

IND2

Moxley Junction, Moxley

 

0.48

   

WAE122

IND5

Former Moxley Tip, Moxley Road

 

10.38

   

WAE205

IND2

Bentley Mill Way East (Phoenix 10 Site C)

 

2.4

   

WAE315

IND5

Casino and Cinema, Bentley Mill Way

 

4.58

   

WAE317

IND5

Millers Close, Bentley Mill Way

 

0.82

   

WAE328

IND3

Leamore Lane (south side - former Dealeys Castings)

 

2.54

   

WAE333

IND5

Willenhall Sewage Works

 

8.9

   

WAE341

IND5

Hughes Road, Moxley

 

4.37

   

 

 

Strategic Allocations

C.31 The following strategic allocations are large sites that are significant in size and that have specific development considerations. Decisions on planning applications for these sites should be made in accordance with the specific policy requirements listed in this document.

C.32 For each site where the allocation includes housing, an indicative site capacity is provided. The precise number of homes to be developed will be determined through the planning application process.

 

Aldridge North & Walsall Wood

 

Policy WSA1 (Walsall Strategic Allocation) – Home Farm, Sandhills, Walsall Wood

Policy WSA1 (Walsall Strategic Allocation) – Home Farm, Sandhills, Walsall Wood

 

General introduction

C.33 Home Farm is located on the northern boundary of Walsall with Lichfield. The northwest boundary is defined by the Wyrley and Essington Canal, with housing beyond and industrial uses to the far northwest corner. The northeast boundary follows the boundary to Lichfield District with more land in agricultural use beyond. The southwest boundary meets the rear garden boundaries to houses on Chester Road. The southeast boundary meets the Lichfield Road with houses on the opposite side.

C.34 The developable area is 54 hectares.

C.35 The estimated capacity of the site is 1435 houses.

C.36 Mixed tenure housing is suitable on the site, with higher densities of at least 35dph and affordable housing provision.
 

Design principles:
  • Deliver appropriate local facilities to support the new residents and to enhance the sustainability of the existing area, including a new primary school and local health centre.
  • Investigation and detailed proposals for remediation of contaminated land.
  • A transport strategy that includes:
    • unconnected access to and from the site along Chester Road and Lichfield Road;
    • necessary capacity mitigation and improvements to the junction at Lichfield Road and Chester Road;
    • provides a new traffic light junction between Lindon Road and Chester Road; and
    • provides opportunities for bus routes to serve the development.
  • Enhanced provision for pedestrians and cyclists, including enhanced connectivity with the district centre.
  • Develop a site-wide Sustainable Drainage Strategy to ensure that drainage requirements can be met on site and are designed to deliver landscape, biodiversity and amenity benefits.
  • A strategy for landscape and habitat creation that provides enhancement, retention and mitigation for established trees and hedges, to ensure there is no significant adverse impact on visual amenity and character or on protected animal species
  • The site is in a MSA and requires prior extraction where practical and environmentally feasible. Where practical and environmentally feasible prior extraction for bedrock and superficial sand and gravel, shall take place.
     


Policy WSA2 – Land at Vicarage Road and Coronation Road, High Heath and land at Mob Lane, Pelsall

Policy WSA2 – Land at Vicarage Road and Coronation Road, High Heath and land at Mob Lane, Pelsall

 

General introduction

C.37 Land at Vicarage Road and Coronation Road and land at Mob Lane is located along the northern urban edge of High Heath. To the north are fields with Pelsall and Clayhanger urban areas beyond, to the east fields and a sewage works, to the south is proposed allocation WSA3, High Heath and an area of housing that is characterised by predominantly traditional semi-detached houses, and to the west is Pelsall and a former railway line.

C.38 The developable site area is 30.19ha.

C.39 The estimated capacity of the site is 713 houses.

C.40 Mixed tenure housing is suitable with higher densities of at least 35dph and affordable housing provision.
 

Design principles:
  • Deliver appropriate local facilities to support the new residents and to enhance the sustainability of the existing area, including a new primary school and local health centre.
  • Investigation of and detailed proposals for the remediation of contaminated land.
  • A transport strategy that includes improvements to Mob Lane and Green Lane.
  • A site-wide Sustainable Drainage Strategy, to ensure that drainage requirements can be met on site and that is designed to deliver landscape, biodiversity and amenity benefits.
  • A strategy for landscape and habitat creation that provides enhancement, retention and / or mitigation for established trees and hedges, to ensure there are no significant adverse impacts on visual amenity and character or on protected animal species.
  • The site is in a MSA and requires prior extraction where practical and environmentally feasible. Where practical and environmentally feasible prior extraction for bedrock and superficial sand and gravel, shall take place.

 

Policy WSA3 – Land north of Stonnall Road, Aldridge

Policy WSA3 – Land north of Stonnall Road, Aldridge

 

General introduction

C.41 Land north of Stonnall Road is located along the eastern urban edge of Aldridge. To the north are houses; to the east agricultural fields; to the south is proposed allocation WAH253 and agriculture beyond; and to the west are houses. The predominant character of houses here are a mix of detached bungalows and houses, modern but traditionally styled.

C.42 The estimated capacity of the site is 13.82ha.

C.43 The site is proposed to be allocated for 363 houses.

C.44 Mixed tenure housing is suitable, with higher densities of at least 35dph and affordable housing provision.
 

Design principles:
  • Improvements to local facilities, to support residents and to enhance the sustainability of the existing area, in particular improved capacity at the primary school and local health centre.
  • Investigation of and detailed proposals for remediation of contaminated land.
  • A transport strategy that includes widening to Stonnall Road for the extent of the site allocation and improves pedestrian access.
  • Develop a site-wide Sustainable Drainage Strategy to ensure that drainage requirements can be met on site and are designed to deliver landscape, biodiversity and amenity benefits.
  • Develop a strategy for landscape and habitat creation that provides enhancement, retention and mitigation for established trees and hedges, to ensure there is no significant adverse impact on visual amenity and character or on protected animal species.
  • The site is in a MSA and requires prior extraction where practical and environmentally feasible. Where practical and environmentally feasible prior extraction for bedrock and superficial sand and gravel, shall take place.

 

 

Bloxwich East

 

Policy WSA4 – Yieldsfield Farm (sometimes recorded as Yieldfields farm), Stafford Road, Bloxwich

Policy WSA4 – Yieldsfield Farm (sometimes recorded as Yieldfields farm), Stafford Road, Bloxwich

 

General introduction

C.45 Yieldsfield Farm is located along the northern urban edge of Bloxwich. To the north are fields with Newtown and Landywood beyond in South Staffordshire District. To the east lie fields and to the south is Bloxwich Golf Course. To the west is the Turnberry housing estate, composed of predominantly modern, traditionally styled detached houses. Within this site is Yieldsfield Hall, a Grade II listed building.

C.46 The developable site area is 26ha.

C.47 The estimated capacity of the site is 978 houses.

C.48 Mixed tenure housing is suitable on the site with higher densities of at least 35dph and affordable housing provision.
 

Design principles:
  • High quality, sensitive design and layout that conserves and enhances the setting and significance of Yieldsfield Hall, a Grade II listed building; this must be informed by a detailed heritage character assessment for the proposal.
  • Delivery of appropriate local facilities to support residents and to enhance the sustainability of the existing area, including a new primary, school and local health centre.
  • Contribution to improvements for secondary school provision in North Bloxwich.
  • Investigation and detailed proposals for remediation of contaminated land.
  • A transport strategy that includes new crossing points on the A34 and a new vehicular junction to serve the development.
  • A site-wide Sustainable Drainage Strategy, to ensure that drainage requirements can be met on site and are designed to deliver landscape, biodiversity and amenity benefits.
  • A strategy for landscape and habitat creation that provides enhancement, retention and mitigation for established trees and hedges, to ensure there is no significant adverse impact on visual amenity and character, in particular that might be experienced from the north and west, and to ensure there is no significant adverse impact on protected animal species.

 

 

Pelsall

 

Policy WSA5 – Land at Yorks Bridge, Lichfield Road, Pelsall

Policy WSA5 – Land at Yorks Bridge, Lichfield Road, Pelsall

 

General introduction

C.49 Yorks Bridge is located on the northern urban edge of Pelsall, along the border with Cannock Chase District. To the north are fields with Norton Canes the nearest urban area beyond in Cannock. To the east lie fields; to the south and west is residential development, predominantly modern, traditionally-styled detached houses. The site contains ten protected trees and a SLINC to the east.

C.50 The developable site area is 13.47ha.

C.51 The estimated capacity of the site is 580 houses.

C.52 Mixed tenure housing is suitable with higher densities of at least 35dph and affordable housing provision.
 

Design principles:
  • Delivery of appropriate local facilities to support residents and to enhance the sustainability of the existing area, including a new primary school and local health centre.
  • Investigation and detailed proposals for the remediation of contaminated land.
  • A transport strategy that includes the widening of Lichfield Road to allow for a ghost turn into the site, and which includes necessary capacity mitigation and improvements to the junction at Lichfield Road, Wolverhampton Road, Lime Lane and Walsall Road.
  • A site-wide Sustainable Drainage Strategy, to ensure that drainage requirements can be met on site and are designed to deliver landscape, biodiversity and amenity benefits whilst protecting existing SLINC designated areas.
  • A strategy for landscape and habitat creation, which provides enhancement, retention and mitigation for protected and established trees and hedges, to ensure there is no significant adverse impact on ecology, biodiversity, visual amenity and character and protected animal species.

 

 

Pheasey Park Farm

 

Policy WSA6 – Land off Sutton Road, Longwood Lane, Walsall

Policy WSA6 – Land off Sutton Road, Longwood Lane, Walsall

 

General introduction

C.53 Land off Sutton Road, Longwood Lane is located along the very northern part of Pheasey Park Farm. To the north are fields, to the east and south are houses and to the west is the canal with Arboretum Park beyond it. The character of the immediate area is defined by predominantly traditionally-styled detached houses. The site has recently been designated a SLINC.

C.54 The developable site area is 7.74ha.

C.55 The estimated capacity of the site is 202 houses.

C.56 Mixed tenure housing is suitable in this location, with higher densities of at least 35dph and affordable housing provision.
 

Design principles:
  • Improvements to local facilities, to support residents and to enhance the sustainability of the existing area, in particular improved capacity at the primary school and local health centre.
  • Investigation of and detailed proposals for the remediation of contaminated land.
  • A transport strategy that includes single access onto Sutton Road, and which ensures that the transport impacts of the development are appropriately managed and mitigated.
  • Enhanced provision for pedestrians and cyclists, including enhanced connectivity with cycle route CR012.
  • A site-wide Sustainable Drainage Strategy to ensure that drainage requirements can be met on site and that are designed to deliver landscape, biodiversity and amenity benefits, which also takes full account of existing watercourses.
  • A strategy for landscape and habitat creation that provides enhancement, retention and mitigation for existing SLINC features and established trees, to ensure there is no significant adverse impact on ecology, biodiversity, visual amenity and character or on protected animal species.

 

 

St Matthews

 

Policy WSA7 – Calderfields West, Land at Aldridge Road, Walsall

Policy WSA7 – Calderfields West, Land at Aldridge Road, Walsall

 

General introduction

C.57 The site at Calderfields West, on land at Aldridge Lane, is located along the eastern urban edge of St. Mathews. To the north are fields, to the east is Calderfields Golf Club, to the south is the Arboretum and to the west are houses. The character of the area is a mix of traditional and modern styled detached houses. Within the developable site area is Calderfields Farm, which provides seven existing barn conversion properties with gated access from Aldridge Road.

C.58 The developable site area is 18.6ha.

C.59 The estimated capacity of the site is 592 houses.

C.60 Mixed tenure housing is suitable with higher densities of at least 35dph and affordable housing provision.
 

Design principles:
  • Deliver appropriate local facilities to support the new residents and to enhance the sustainability of the existing area, including a new primary school and local health centre.
  • Investigation and detailed proposals for the remediation of contaminated land.
  • A transport strategy that ensure that the transport impacts of the development are appropriately managed and mitigated.
  • Enhanced provision for pedestrians and cyclists, including enhanced connectivity with the town centre.
  • A site-wide Sustainable Drainage Strategy, to ensure that drainage requirements can be met on site and are designed to deliver landscape, biodiversity and amenity benefits.
  • A strategy for landscape and habitat creation, in particular along the southern boundary to the Arboretum, providing new tree planting to ensure there is no significant adverse impact on the visual amenity and character of the Arboretum, nor on protected animal species.

 

 

Streetly

 

Policy WSA8 – Land between Queslett Road, Doe Bank Lane and Aldridge Road, Pheasey

Policy WSA8 – Land between Queslett Road, Doe Bank Lane and Aldridge Road, Pheasey

 

General introduction

C.61 Land between Queslett Road, Doe Bank Lane and Aldridge Road is made up of fields between the Pheasey Estate and Streetly. To the north are agricultural fields, to the east, south and west lies housing. The site surrounds Doe Bank Lane Farmhouse and farm buildings to the west, which are Grade II listed.

C.62 The developable site area is 42.27ha.

C.63 The estimated capacity of the site is 1426 houses.

C.64 Mixed tenure housing is suitable with higher densities of at least 35dph and affordable housing provision.
 

Design principles:
  • High quality, sensitive design and layout that conserves and enhances the setting and significance of Doe Bank Lane Farmhouse and farm buildings, which are Grade II listed buildings; this must be informed by a detailed heritage character assessment undertaken for the proposal.
  • Deliver appropriate local facilities to support the new residents and to enhance the sustainability of the existing area, including a new primary school and local health centre..
  • Investigation and detailed proposals for remediation of contaminated land.
  • A transport strategy that ensures that the transport impacts of the development are appropriately managed and mitigated.
  • A site-wide Sustainable Drainage Strategy, to ensure that drainage requirements can be met on site and designed to deliver landscape, biodiversity and amenity benefits.
  • A strategy for landscape and habitat creation that provides enhancement, retention and mitigation for established trees and hedges, to ensure there is no significant adverse impact on visual amenity and character, nor on protected animal species.
  • The site is in a MSA and requires prior extraction where practical and environmentally feasible. Where practical and environmentally feasible prior extraction for bedrock and superficial sand and gravel, shall take place.
     

Policy WSA9 – Land to the east of Chester Road, north of Pacific Nurseries, Hardwick

Policy WSA9 – Land to the east of Chester Road, north of Pacific Nurseries, Hardwick

 

General introduction

C.65 Land to the east of Chester Road (WAH230), north of Pacific Nurseries (WAH246) and Pacific Nurseries (WAH254) are a cluster of three sites, currently used for a mix of agriculture, horse grazing and a garden centre; to the east is a railway line with a golf course beyond it; to the south lies the urban edge of Streetly; and to the west are agricultural fields.

C.66 The developable site area is 13.33ha.

C.67 The estimated capacity of the site is 415 houses.

C.68 Mixed tenure housing is suitable with higher densities of at least 35dph and affordable housing provision.
 

Design principles:
  • Deliver appropriate local facilities to support the new residents and to enhance the sustainability of the existing area, including a new primary school and local health centre.
  • Investigation and detailed proposals for remediation of contaminated land.
  • A transport strategy that ensures the transport impacts of the development are appropriately managed and mitigated.
  • Enhanced provision for pedestrians and cyclists, including enhanced connectivity with the local centre.
  • A site-wide Sustainable Drainage Strategy, to ensure that drainage requirements can be met on site and that is designed to deliver landscape, biodiversity and amenity benefits.
  • A strategy for landscape and habitat creation which provides enhancement, retention and mitigation for established trees, to ensure there is no significant adverse impact on visual amenity and character nor on protected animal species.
  • The site is in a MSA and requires prior extraction where practical and environmentally feasible. Where practical and environmentally feasible prior extraction for bedrock and superficial sand and gravel, shall take place.

 

 

Waste

Strategic Waste Management Sites

C.69 The existing strategic sites identified on the Waste Key Diagram are the significant waste management facilities operating in the Black Country. They have been identified through a detailed analysis of all known licenced and exempt facilities in each authority area.

C.70 Under Policy W2 (Waste Sites), the BCA will safeguard all existing strategic and other waste management facilities from inappropriate development, in order to maintain existing levels of waste management capacity and meet Strategic Priority 13.

C.71 The strategic waste management sites within Walsall Borough are listed in the following table:
 

Table 38 - Strategic Waste Management Sites in Walsall

BCP Site Ref

Walsall SAD Site Ref

Site Name and Address

Operational Capacity (tpa)

Total Landfill Capacity (tonnes)[10]

Municipal Waste Recovery Installations

WS02

WS9

Aldridge MRF (Biffa)[11], Westgate Aldridge

150,000

Municipal Waste Recovery – Supporting Infrastructure

WS09

WS8

Fryers Road WTS, Bloxwich

100,000

WS10

WS8

Fryers Road HWRC, Bloxwich

12,000

WS11

WS14

Merchants Way HWRC, Aldridge

10,000

WS12

WS19

Walsall Council Environmental Depot, Brownhills

2,700

Waste Disposal Installations

WS18

WS10

Highfields South Landfill, Walsall Wood

130,000

928,000

Significant Hazardous Waste Treatment Infrastructure

WS20

WS6

Empire Treatment Works, Aldridge

100,000

Significant Metal Recycling Sites (MRSs)

WS29

W17

Chas B Pugh, Heath Road, Darlaston

18,000

WS30

W21

ELG Haniel Metals, Heath Road, Darlaston

30,000

WS31

WS05

EMR Darlaston, Bentley Road South

260,000

WS32

W62

Scanmetals (UK) Ltd, Bilston Lane, Willenhall

56,000

WS33

W77

Tandom Metallurgical, Apex Road, Brownhills

25,000

Other Significant Waste Management Infrastructure

WS49

WS17

Bescot Triangle South, Bescot Road

50,000

WS50

WS03

Credential Environmental, Parkway North, Western Way

40,000

WS51

W76

D S Smith Birmingham Depot, Rose Hill Industrial Estate, Willenhall

20,000

WS52

WS01

D E O'Reilly Waste Management[12], Coppice Lane, Aldridge

40,000

WS53

WS05

EMR Darlaston (Fridge Recycling Plant), Bentley Mill Lane, Darlaston

40,000

WS54

WS04

Ecobat Logistics[13], Crescent Works Industrial Estate, Willenhall Road

25,000

WS55

WS11

Veolia Darlaston, Holland Industrial Park, Bentley Road South

30,000

WS56

W16

Central Waste Oil Collections, Premier Business Park, Queen Street

35,000

Sources: Environment Agency: Waste Data Interrogator (WDI) 2007 – 2018, Operational Incinerators, 2018, Public Register, Remaining Landfill Capacity in England as at end of 2018 Version 2.
 

Preferred Areas for New Waste Facilities

C.72 A number of employment areas have been identified in the Black Country Waste Study (BCWS) as being most suited to the development of new waste recovery, waste treatment and waste transfer infrastructure.

C.73 Under Policy W3 (Preferred Areas for New Waste Facilities), these areas are considered least likely to give rise to land use conflicts, and in several cases, there is already co-location of existing waste facilities to which new sites would contribute.

C.74 There are three such areas in Walsall Borough that are identified on the Waste Key Diagram and listed in the following table:
 

Table 39 - Walsall Preferred Areas for New Waste Facilities

BCP Site Ref

Walsall SAD Site Ref

Site name and address

Area (Ha)

WPwa1

IN18.1 IN27

Leamore and Newfield Close Industrial Estates, Bloxwich

80.4

WPwa2

IN88 IN95 IN96

Holland Industrial Park / Heath Road and Environs, Darlaston

52.4

WPwa3

IN67 IN68

Ashmore Lake Industrial Estate, Willenhall

40

 

Minerals

C.75 The Black Country Minerals Study (BCMS, Tables 12.10 and 12.9) lists all known existing mineral sites and mineral infrastructure sites in the Black Country.

C.76 Existing mineral sites within the Black Country include permitted mineral extraction sites, stockpiles, brick and tile works, and a pot clay factory.

C.77 Existing Black Country mineral infrastructure sites include secondary / recycled aggregates production, rail linked aggregates depots, coating plants, ready-mix (RMX) concrete batching plants, manufacture of concrete products, and dry silo mortar (DSM) plants.

C.78 Under Policy MIN2 (Minerals Safeguarding Areas, MSAs), the BCA will safeguard all existing mineral sites and mineral infrastructure sites from inappropriate development – this being necessary in order to retain existing capacity, and thereby helping to make best use of and conserve the Black Country's finite mineral resources and meet Strategic Priority 14.

C.79 The locations of these Black Country mineral sites and mineral infrastructure sites are identified on the Minerals Key Diagram, and those sites located within Walsall Borough are listed in the following tables:
 

Table 40 - Walsall Mineral Sites

BCP Site Ref

Walsall SAD Site Ref

Site Name and Address

Type

MSwa1

MB1

Aldridge Brickworks, Brick Yard Road, Aldridge

Brickworks

MSwa2

MB2

Atlas Brickworks, Stubbers Green Road, Aldridge

Brickworks

MSwa3

MP2

Atlas Quarry, 175 Stubbers Green Road, Walsall

Brick Clay

MSwa4

MP3

Birch Coppice, Pelsall Rd, Walsall

Coal and Fireclay

MSwa5

MP4

Branton Hill Quarry and extension, Branton Hill Lane, Walsall

Sand

MSwa6

MXA2

Highfields North, Walsall Road, Walsall

Brick Clay (dormant permitted minerals site)

MSwa7

MP9

Land at Brownhills Common, Chester Road North, Brownhills

Coal and Fireclay (dormant permitted minerals site)

MSwa8

MP5

Sandown Brickworks, Stubbers Green Road, Aldridge

Brickworks

MSwa9

MB3

Sandown Quarry, Stubbers Green Road, Aldridge

Brick Clay

MSwa10

MP7

Swan Works, Swan Works, Pelsall Road

Manufacture and supply of pot clay blends



Table 41 - Walsall Mineral Infrastructure Sites

BCP Site Ref

Walsall SAD Site Ref

Site Name and Address

Type

MIwa1

MI4

Bescot Triangle South, Off Bescot Road, Walsall

Aggregates recycling

MIwa2

MI2

Branton Hill CLEUD Relocation Site, Branton Hill Lane, Walsall

Aggregates recycling

MIwa3

MI3

Breedon Walsall Cement and Aggregates Depot, Fairground Way, Walsall

Rail-linked aggregates depot

MIwa4

MI3

Breedon Concrete Plant, Fairground Way, Walsall

Concrete batching plant

MIwa5

MI5

Express Asphalt, Downs Road, Darlaston

Coating plant

MIwa6

MI16

G & B G Morris, Willenhall Industrial Estate, off Eastacre, Willenhall

Secondary aggregates processing

MIwa7

MI17

Interserve Site Services, Brickyard Road, Walsall

Aggregates recycling

MIwa8

MI18

Concrete Walsall, Fenchurch Close, Walsall

Tarmac / concrete batching plant

 

 

D. City of Wolverhampton

Introduction

D.1 Wolverhampton is the City of the Black Country, forming the gateway between the West Midlands conurbation and the countryside of Staffordshire and Shropshire. The City has excellent transport connectivity with the sub-region and the rest of the UK. It is well- served by the M54 and M6 motorways and benefits from good public transport links through the Metro, cross-country railway links and in its role as a hub of the sub-regional bus network.

D.2 Wolverhampton is a young, vibrant and diverse City with a population of 263,357 people in 2019. The City covers an area of 69.4sq km and includes the City Centre and the town centres of Bilston and Wednesfield. While the City has the smallest population of the four Black Country local authorities, it is the second most densely-populated, the administrative boundary being very tightly drawn around the urban area. The northern, western and south-western fringes of the City lie within the West Midlands Green Belt, which also extends into the urban area in a series of green 'corridors'.

D.3 There were 103,000 jobs in the City in 2019, concentrated in the City Centre, and a series of employment areas that are home to a wide range of manufacturing and logistics businesses. The City economy has traditional strengths in high-value manufacturing and construction and is also developing clusters in other key sectors while retaining a strong focus on investing in skills. Wolverhampton is home to the University of Wolverhampton, who are investing £100m into the Springfield super-campus – an international centre for urban innovation - and the City of Wolverhampton College and its Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) orientated academies.

D.4 The City grew initially as a market town, specialising in the wool trade. In the industrial revolution it became a major centre for coal mining, lock-making and subsequently the manufacture of cars and motorcycles. This has created a rich legacy of historic buildings and attractive parks and open spaces. It has a strong sporting, cultural and leisure offer, and is home to Wolverhampton Wanderers Football Club, the Grand Theatre and nationally important Civic Halls concert venue.

D.5 Covid-19 hit the city hard from the earliest and during subsequent waves of the pandemic, exacerbating existing social and economic challenges including lower-than-average earnings, relatively high levels of unemployment and a need to enhance the skills base of the local workforce. But the City is bold and ambitious city and wants to move forward, plan for recovery and 'level up' prosperity for the benefit of the community.
 

The Strategy

D.6 In the context of the issues and opportunities outlined above, the 2030 Vision for Wolverhampton is for:

'a place where people come from far and wide to work, shop, study and enjoy our vibrant city. It will be transformed while still retaining all of those attributes that give our city its unique identity. A healthy, thriving and sustainable international 'smart city' – renowned for its booming economy and skilled workforce, rich diversity and a commitment to fairness and equality that ensures everyone has the chance to benefit from success.'

D.7 This Plan forms an essential part of this strategy, supporting the re-energising, diversification and re-purposing of the City Centre, supporting the recovery and growth of the economy, and providing for a continuous supply of new homes to meet the needs of local and wider communities. At the same time, the Plan will protect key environmental assets – the green belt, the network of high quality green and blue spaces, and the local character and heritage.

D.8 This Plan supports the delivery of 12,100 new homes and 65ha of employment land to 2039, supporting the growth of the City's population to around 290,000 people and a workforce of 180,000. To plan for this growth, locations that are both sustainable and deliverable have been prioritised in line with the Spatial Strategy set out in Policy CSP1. This growth will be supported by transport investment, focused on enhancing the rail and rapid transit network and the key road corridors and investment in walking and cycling. Development will help to green the City, by increasing tree cover and providing biodiversity net gain and will help to deliver priority environmental improvements to ensure residents have easy access to a range of healthy recreation opportunities. These priorities will include those set out in the emerging Black Country Nature Recovery Network Strategy, Wolverhampton Open Space and Playing Pitch Strategies, and include opportunities to improve the canal network and restore the Bradley Arm Canal Link (as set out in BCAAP Policy BC7).
 

Figure 21 - City of Wolverhampton Spatial Plan

Figure 21 - City of Wolverhampton Spatial Plan


D.9 Development and investment will be focussed on Wolverhampton City Centre and three Core Regeneration Areas as summarised in Table 42.
 

Table 42 - Wolverhampton Housing and Employment Growth Network

Location

Housing (net homes)

Employment Land allocations (ha)

Growth Network

Wolverhampton City Centre (Wolverhampton Strategic Centre)

4838

(Sites = 3276;

Windfalls = 812;

Uplift = 750)

0.0

Stafford Road Core Regeneration Area

395

16.8

Wednesfield Core Regeneration Area

627

26.3

Bilston Core Regeneration Area

2285

22.9

Total Growth Network

8,145

66.0

Towns and Neighbourhoods Area

Bushbury Neighbourhood Growth Area

532

0.0

Fallings Park Neighbourhood Growth Area

303

0.0

Other Sites in Wolverhampton Towns and Neighbourhoods Area

1468

0.0

Total Towns and Neighbourhoods Area

2,303

0.0

Small Windfall Housing Sites (outside Wolverhampton City Centre)

1652

0.0

Wolverhampton Total

12,100

65.0

 

Wolverhampton City Centre

D.10 Wolverhampton City Centre, as designated on the Policies Map and shown on Figure 21 is the administrative, commercial and cultural heart of the City and in its role as the City of the Black Country. It is the focus for a wide range of civic, retail, cultural and leisure functions. It is a location that is highly accessible by a range of public transport options, including rail, Metro and bus services. The BCP supports the diversification, repurposing and rejuvenation of the City centre, promoting a well-balanced mix of commercial, business and service uses. Changing shopping patterns and other challenges to the traditional high street will be addressed through increased flexibility and by facilitating the consolidation of the shopping core (particularly to reduce vacancy rates), complemented by surrounding office and leisure-led mixed uses, and supported by maximising residential provision in all locations (including the use of upper floors). The character and quality of both the cultural and civic function of the City centre and the built and natural environment will be improved, helping to make the City centre a sustainable, healthy and attractive place to shop, live, work and visit. This will be achieved through BCP policies (particularly CSP2, CEN2 and Environmental Transformation policies), City centre regeneration projects and through more detailed policies in the City Centre Area Action Plan (AAP)
 

Figure 22 - Wolverhampton Strategic Centre Boundary

Figure 22 - Wolverhampton Strategic Centre Boundary

D.11 The Black Country Centres Study advises that the future prosperity of the City centre is predicated on attracting additional footfall. This can be achieved through new residential development, the repurposing of existing vacant space to create and attract interest in, and qualitative improvements to, the leisure offer and associated services. The provision of Grade A offices to focus employment in the centre will also contribute to generating additional footfall. This will build on the strategy of the City Centre AAP, which looked to consolidate the role of the shopping core and encourage complementary activities such as leisure, office and residential uses; and the need for planning 'flexibility' to capture future investment. Regeneration of the City Centre is being delivered through various funding mechanisms and regeneration schemes. For example, the Future High Streets Fund is a £15.7million scheme providing major works that focus on 15ha covering the Victoria Street, Bell Street, Cleveland Street, Fold Street and public realm around the Civic Halls area of the City Centre. This will involve new investment in public realm and events space, helping to boost the evening economy and unlock a wider package of investment, maximising the creation of new jobs, delivery of new homes, a hotel, event zone and green public space improvements.

D.12 The key opportunities for Wolverhampton City Centre are:

a) building on the current wave of development activity - there are several major investment and regeneration opportunities underway (2021) within the City centre, including the Interchange Commercial Area, Canalside, Westside Development Area and the Civic Halls;
b) providing high density uses that would aid in increasing footfall; and
c) patronage of the centre's facilities;
d) exploring the potential to attract more visitors in the afternoon and evening;
e) increasing a more family-oriented evening economy;
f) continuing to improve on the perception of the centre as a safe place;
g) exploring the opportunities to increase cycling?
h) maximising the opportunity for rapid 5g rollout.

D.13 Policy CSP2 sets out the critical role of the four Strategic Centres as the key drivers to deliver the overall growth Strategy. This is supplemented by Policy CEN2, which defines this role in more detail, providing specific guidance on the range of activities and scale of development that will be appropriate.

D.14 The City centre benefits from an existing Area Action Plan, adopted in 2016. The AAP identifies a number of character areas, with an associated set of policies and proposals with indicative development capacity figures for each one. The early review of this AAP is a priority for the Council and will commence in 2023. Until the AAP review is completed, all AAP policies remain relevant for proposals within the BCP boundary of Wolverhampton Strategic Centre. The Blakenhall and Graiseley[14] and All Saints[15] (Character Areas of the AAP are outside the BCP Wolverhampton Strategic Centre boundary and were consequently 'in scope' as potential locations for BCP site allocations). Therefore, AAP allocations within these areas have been replaced by allocations in the BCP, as detailed in Appendix 15D.

D.15 For the purposes of Policies CEN1- CEN6, within Wolverhampton Strategic Centre the following are relevant in-centre boundaries (see also Appendix 16):

a) Retail - Primary Shopping Area (AAP Policy CC1(a) and CA1 – Shopping Core)
b) Office - Wolverhampton City Centre AAP boundary (AAP Policy CC2)
c) Leisure - Wolverhampton Ring Road (AAP Policy CC3)

D.16 The housing capacity for Wolverhampton City Centre set out in Table 46 is based on existing permissions and AAP allocations, but also includes an estimated uplift based on more recent evidence, including the Black Country Centres study and emerging development proposals, as detailed in the Black Country Urban Capacity Review Update 2021. This housing capacity figure will be further tested in detail through the AAP review, but provides a sound basis to understand the housing capacity of the City centre for the purposes of the BCP.
 

Stafford Road Core Regeneration Area (SRCRA)

D.17 The Stafford Road Core Regeneration Area is focussed on the A449 Stafford Road and is one of the main gateways into the Black Country. It contains important road, canal and rail infrastructure that links the City with Staffordshire, Shropshire, Telford and northwest England.

D.18 The BCP supports the role of this area as one of the premier employment locations in the Black Country, building on the success of the adjacent i54 Business Park in South Staffordshire, by safeguarding jobs in existing Strategic and Local Employment areas, complemented by sites to accommodate new high-quality development in Fordhouses and Wolverhampton Science Park. There are also more limited opportunities for residential development. The Plan also promotes enhancements to public transport, walking, cycling and highway networks, particularly along the A449, to maintain sustainable travel patterns and secure private sector investment. Development will respect and enhance the historic character and local distinctiveness of the area, with investment in environmental infrastructure including the canals, open spaces and wildlife habitats.
 

Wednesfield Core Regeneration Area (WCRA)

D.19 The Wednesfield Core Regeneration Area is centred on the Walsall to Wolverhampton Growth Corridor, recognised as a priority for investment in the WMCA SIDP and the West Midlands Housing Deal. The area contains a range of facilities, including New Cross Hospital, Wednesfield Town Centre, the Bentley Bridge retail centre and the Wednesfield employment area. It is subject to a number of existing regeneration projects including housing renewal and new housing at the Heath Town Estate, Wednesfield Town Centre enhancements and the A454 Eastern Gateway enhancement programme. It is also a key transport corridor linking the City with Walsall and the M6 motorway, served by the A454 Wolverhampton to Walsall dual carriageway and the Walsall to Wolverhampton railway line.

D.20 The BCP supports the protection and enhancement of the Wednesfield employment area by identifying a number of sites for development and safeguarding existing business premises from redevelopment to non-employment uses. The BCP also promotes enhanced connectivity both through and into the area to better meet the needs of businesses and local people. Key projects include the improvements to the A454 and access to New Cross Hospital.
 

Bilston Core Regeneration Area (BCRA)

D.21 The Bilston Core Regeneration Area acts as a gateway linking Wolverhampton to the heart of the Black Country and Birmingham by rail, Metro, road and canal. At the centre of the Core Regeneration Area is the largest concentration of industrial land in the City, providing thousands of jobs and reflecting the area's industrial heritage. This industrial core, fringed by housing, is anchored by Wolverhampton City Centre in the north and Bilston town centre in the south. Bilston town centre acts as a significant focus for the local community, offering a range of shopping, leisure and community facilities.

D.22 The BCP supports the protection and enhancement of the employment function of the area by identifying new development opportunities and encouraging the refurbishment and enhancement of existing premises. The BCP also identifies opportunities for residential development on poor-quality surplus industrial land clustered around the City centre and Bilston town centre, building on the success of flagship partnership-led regeneration schemes currently on-site including Bilston Urban Village, Steelhouse Lane and Ward Street. The BCP promotes enhanced connectivity and high-quality networks of open space focussed on the canal and Metro corridor to serve new communities, with significant environmental projects underway at Ward Street and Bilston Urban Village, and further improvements planned for East Park and the Bradley Canal Arm Link.
 

Wolverhampton Towns and Neighbourhoods Area (WTNA)

D.23 The Towns and Neighbourhoods Area of the City includes Tettenhall and Penn to the west, Bushbury, Wednesfield and Ashmore Park to the north and Ettinghshall to the south. This is where the majority of residents live, and is served by areas of open space, health and education facilities and a network of district and local centres as defined in Policy CEN1 and CEN5. There are also a small number of employment areas subject to Policy EMP4, providing a valuable source of jobs for local people.

D.24 The BCP seeks to sustain and enhance the Towns and Neighbourhoods Area by ensuring that residents have good access to jobs, shopping, health, recreation, open space and other facilities to meet day-to day community needs. The Towns and Neighbourhoods Area will provide for enhanced housing choice through the bringing forward of a constant supply of development opportunities.

D.25 The Towns and Neighbourhoods Area also includes two new Neighbourhood Growth Areas: Bushbury (BNGA) and Fallings Park (FPNGA), located in the north east of the City. Each of these Neighbourhood Growth Areas covers a Strategic Allocation, for which there is a separate Policy to guide master planning work (see Policies CSA1 and CSA2 below). Housing growth in this part of the City will be supported by strengthened local infrastructure, including local highway improvements, provision for a new primary school (should this be required) and creation of new green space of value for residents and wildlife. Where there are cross-boundary issues arising from the emerging South Staffordshire Local Plan, infrastructure investment will be coordinated with South Staffordshire Council and Staffordshire County Council.
 

Green Belt Areas

D.26 The green belt areas of Wolverhampton form a series of wedges and urban fringe areas and perform many different functions. The green belt areas do contain some rural landscapes, including agricultural land and rural settlements such as Penn Village. However, much of the Wolverhampton green belt is urban in character and provides a network of natural and formal open space, education buildings, recreational facilities (such as Aldersley Leisure Village, Dunstall Park Racecourse and golf courses), and other infrastructure (such as sewage works, sub-stations and cemeteries). The Smestow Valley Local Nature Reserve, which follows the routes of the canal network, disused railway and Smestow Brook running north-south through the western part of the City, is a particularly important wedge of green belt of high value for wildlife and people, and a priority for improvement and extension. Northycote Farm Country Park is another key community facility located in the green belt, which is a priority for improvement – this will be significantly supported through delivery of the Bushbury Strategic Allocation CSA1 (see below).
 

Delivering the Strategy

D.27 This strategy will be delivered by:

a) The allocation of sites and implementation of policies in the BCP across the administrative area to accommodate housing and employment development;
b) The saving of policies and designations contained in existing Local Plan documents unless specifically replaced by Policies in the Black Country Plan as listed in Tables 43 - 48 and Appendix 15D;
c) An early review of the adopted Wolverhampton City Centre Area Action Plan to refresh detailed site allocations within the Wolverhampton Strategic Centre boundary in a comprehensive manner, in accordance with the Vision and Strategic priorities

D.28 Tables 43 - 48 provide details of all development allocations and waste and minerals allocations made through the BCP within Wolverhampton (outside the Wolverhampton Strategic Centre boundary). These allocations are shown on Figure 21. A small number of development allocations are considered to be of strategic significance to delivery of the BCP because of their size, in combination with adjoining allocations. These have been grouped together to form two Strategic Allocations, each of which has a separate policy, providing details of the specific constraints and requirements affecting development. This policy should be read alongside the information for each allocation provided in Tables 43- 48.

D.29 A number of the allocations replace existing allocations made in adopted Local Plan documents, which formed part of the Wolverhampton Policies Map. Where this is the case, the previous allocation reference and the Local Plan document concerned are listed. Appendix 15D provides details of all other Local Plan designations in Wolverhampton which have also been replaced or amended through this Plan. Such changes have only been made where this is necessary to deliver Development Allocations. All detailed allocation and designation boundaries can be viewed on the online Wolverhampton Policies Map.
 

Development Allocations

Table 43 - Wolverhampton Housing Allocations in Black Country Plan

BCP site ref / location

Previous Local Plan allocation (replaced unless stated)

Site name and address

Appropriate Uses

Indicative development capacity

(net homes)

Gross site area (ha) (brownfield /greenfield)

Indicative net developable area (ha)

Net density (dph)

Anticipated delivery timescale

Further information

WOH183 WCRA

HNP – H6 (not replaced)

Former G & P Batteries, Grove Street, Heath Town

Housing

56

0.79 (B)

0.79

71

By 2025

Development has outline planning permission

WOH186 WCRA

BCAAP – H1

East of Qualcast Road, Wolverhampton

Housing

101

2.4 0 (B)

2.00

51

By 2029

Development has outline planning permission.

WOH192 BCRA

CCAAP – 10d (part)

Dudley Road / Bell Place, Blakenhall

Housing

100

0.68 (B)

0.68

147

By 2025

Development has full planning permission for housing and offices. Remaining part of 10d is not now developable.

WOH182 BCRA

CCAAP – 11a

Former Royal Hospital, Royal Hospital Development Area, All Saints

Housing

192

5.13 (B)

4.11

47

By 2029

Development has outline / full planning permission

WOH187 WCRA

BCAAP – H1 (part)

West of Qualcast Road, Wolverhampton

Housing

119

3.40 (B)

3.00

40

2029-34

Occupied employment land. Majority of site suitable for 40 dph subject to minor improvements to access to health services. Any development should be designed to mitigate noise and vibration effects arising from neighbouring land uses.

WOH188 WCRA

BCAAP – H1 (part)

West of Colliery Road, Wolverhampton

Housing and Employment

90

2.94 (B)

2.00

45

2034-49

Occupied employment land. 75% of site suitable for housing at 45 dph and 25% suitable for employment uses. Any development should be designed to mitigate noise and vibration effects arising from neighbouring land uses. Remaining part of H1 is not now developable.

WOH189 BCRA

BCAAP – H2

Delta Trading Estate, Bilston Road, Wolverhampton

Housing

80

2.00 (B)

2.00

40

2034-39

Occupied employment land. Site suitable for 40 dph subject to access improvements. The Bilston Corridor Canals Conservation Area Appraisal and Management Proposals sets out principles for development on this site.

WOH190 BCRA

BCAAP – H6

Greenway Road, Bradley, Wolverhampton

Housing

180

4.00 (B)

4.00

45

2029-34:

80

2034-39:

100

Occupied employment land. Site suitable for 45 dph subject to access improvements.

WOH191 BCRA

BCAAP – MU2

South of Oxford Street, Bilston

Housing

20

0.63 (B)

0.45

45

2034-39

Occupied employment land. Site suitable for 45 dph subject to access improvements. Any development should be designed to mitigate noise effects arising from neighbouring land uses.

WOH185 BCRA

BCAAP – HOS1 BCAAP Recreational Open Space (not to be replaced)

Alexander Metals Open Space, Darlaston Lane / Wrenbury Drive, The Lunt

Housing and Open Space

70

4.08 (G)

1.75

40

2029-34

A development of around 70 new homes on 2 ha of open space to the east of Wrenbury Drive and along the northern edge of Bailey's Pool (exact extent to be determined). Subject to mitigation for loss of open space through creation of a 4 ha area of Neighbourhood Park to serve the local area on the remaining Alexander Metals Open Space. The details of the Neighbourhood Park creation works are to be determined in consultation with the local community and should include any necessary improvements to paths around Bailey's Pool, to facilitate fishing and deal with drainage issues. Links via the Black Country Route path/cycleway to Dingle Wood and a multi-use games area to the south to be maintained. Housing should front onto Bailey's Pool, making the pool safer to use, and the development should be designed and constructed so as to minimise amenity impacts on existing residents of Wrenbury Drive, including noise, traffic safety and parking. The site is a former landfill and the existing mound will need to be flattened and material removed to provide a developable area. There are records of great-crested newts on lower-lying parts of the site behind Wrenbury Drive, therefore an ecological survey should be carried out and retention of these areas or mitigation may be required.

WOH195 BCRA

BCAAP – B3

Land at Hall Street / The Orchard, Bilston Town Centre

Housing and Commercial

21

0.12 (B)

0.12

175

2034-39

Site located within Bilston Town Centre therefore suitable for net density of over 100 dph.

WOH193 / WOH194 BCRA

CCAAP – 10g

Former St Luke's Junior School, Goldthorn Road, Wolverhampton

Housing

89

2.21 (B/G)

2.21

40

By 2029

Part is former school buildings and part is former school playing fields. Compensation for loss of these playing fields has already been provided at new St Luke's School site. Capacity may be constrained by highways access. Work is underway to re-assess the capacity of this site which will be reflected in the Publication Plan.

WOH199 WTNA

Not allocated

Former Northicote Secondary School, Northwood Park Road, Wolverhampton

Housing

178

4.94 (B/G)

4.94

36

By 2024

Part is former school buildings and part is former school playing fields. Full planning application (19/01269/FUL) under consideration as of March 2021.

WOH196 BCRA

Not allocated

Dobbs Street, Wolverhampton

Housing

266

0.96 (B)

0.96

277

By 2029

Former banqueting suite and industrial units acquired by WMCA in 2020 for high density residential.

WOH198 WTNA

Not allocated

Former Beckminster House, Beckminster Road, Wolverhampton

Housing

15

0.86 (B)

0.25

60

By 2029

Grade II Listed Building in grounds with potential for conversion / refurbishment to provide approx. 15 flats.

WOH184 WTNA

Not allocated

Former Rookery Lodge, Woodcross Lane, Wolverhampton

Housing

16

1.04 (B)

0.25

64

2029-34

Permission granted 2012 for care village including self-contained accommodation. Not brought forward due to viability / mineshafts. External funding being sought.

WOH200 WTNA

Not allocated

Former Nelson Mandela House, Whitburn Close, Wolverhampton

Housing

20

0.6 (B)

0.6

33

By 2024

 

WOH201 WTNA

Not allocated

Former Stowheath Day / Childrens Centres, Stowheath Lane, Wolverhampton

Housing

45

1.13 (B)

1.13

40

By 2029

Site suitable for 40 dph..

WOH202 WTNA

Not allocated

Land to rear of former Stowheath Day Centre, Stowheath Lane, Wolverhampton

Housing

16

0.39 (G)

0.39

40

By 2029

Site suitable for 40 dph.

WOH197 BCRA

Not allocated

Former Pipe Hall, The Orchard, Bilston

Housing

20

0.13 (B)

0.13

154

By 2024

Listed building purchased by WMCA in 2020 for residential development and suitable for conversion to create up to 20 flats.

WOH272 BCRA

Not allocated

Lane Street / Highfields Road, Bradley

Housing

72

1.79 (B)

1.79

40

2029-34

Occupied employment land submitted through BCP 'call for sites'. Site suitable for 40 dph, subject to a design which: protects the operation of employment land to the east; retains the locally listed Highfield Works building; respects the setting of this building and the Bilston Canal Corridor Conservation Area within which it falls; and respects the Area of High Historic Townscape Value designation covering the whole site. Recreational open space needs of new residents to be met through off-site improvements to local open space.

WOH274 WTNA

BCAAP Recreational Open Space (not to be replaced)

Moseley Road Open Space (part), Langdale Drive, Bilston

Housing

85

1.89 (G)

1.89

45

By 2029

Part of recreational open space suitable for 45 dph, subject to improvements to local open space sufficient to offset loss and meet needs of new residents.

WOH259 BNGA

Not allocated

North of Moseley Road, Bushbury

Housing

78

2.01 (G)

1.95

40

By 2034 (see CSA1 for est. phasing)

Site removed from green belt. See Policy CSA1 for further details.

WOH258 BNGA

Not allocated

South of Moseley Road, Bushbury

Housing

124

4.26 (G)

3.10

40

By 2034 (see CSA1 for est. phasing)

Site removed from green belt. See Policy CSA1 for further details.

WOH257 BNGA

Not allocated

Northycote Lane, Bushbury

Housing

182

7.44 (G)

4.56

40

By 2034 (see CSA1 for est. phasing)

Site removed from green belt. See Policy CSA1 for further details.

WOH260 BNGA

Not allocated

Land at Bushbury Lane / Legs Lane, Bushbury

Housing and Primary School

148

7.30 (G)

3.70

40

By 2034 (see CSA1 for est. phasing)

Site removed from green belt. See Policy CSA1 for further details

WOH263 FPNGA

Not allocated

Land North of Grassy Lane, Fallings Park

Housing

80

2.70 (G)

2.00

40

By 2034 (see CSA2 for est. phasing)

Site removed from green belt. See Policy CSA2 for further details.

WOH264 FPNGA

Not allocated

Land at Grassy Lane, Fallings Park

Housing

95

2.38 (G)

2.38

40

By 2034 (see CSA2 for est. phasing)

Site removed from green belt. See Policy CSA2 for further details.

WOH262 FPNGA

WUDP Recreational Open Space (not to be replaced)

Open space at Grassy Lane, Fallings Park

Housing and Recreational Open Space

88

3.20 (G)

2.20

40

By 2034 (see CSA2 for est. phasing)

Site removed from green belt. See Policy CSA2 for further details.

WOH271 FPNGA

Not allocated

Land east of Wood Hayes Road, Wolverhampton

Housing

40

2.04 (G)

1.60

25

By 2034 (see CSA2 for est. phasing)

Site removed from green belt. See Policy CSA2 for further details.

WOH266 WTNA

Not allocated

City of Wolverhampton College / Activity Centre, Paget Road, Compton Park

Housing

140

3.52 (B)

3.52

40

By 2029

Site removed from green belt. The new green belt boundary will continue to follow the edge of built development. Mitigation for green belt loss to be provided through accessibility, biodiversity and environmental quality improvements to nearby Smestow Valley Local Nature Reserve. Site suitable for 40 dph, in accordance with local character, subject to relocation of the College and Activity Centre to appropriate sites and splitting highways access between Paget Road and Compton Park to limit impact on Paget Road capacity. Recreational open space needs of new residents to be met through off-site improvements to local open space. .

WOH261 WTNA

Not allocated

Oxley Park Golf Club land adjacent to 139 Oxley Moor Road, Wolverhampton

Housing

3

0.13 (G)

0.13

Na

By 2029

Site removed from green belt. The new green belt boundary will continue to follow the edge of Oxley Park Golf Course. The whole of Oxley Park Golf Course, including this site, is designated as a SLINC. Mitigation for green belt and SLINC loss to be provided through accessibility, biodiversity and environmental quality improvements to Oxley Park Golf Course. Capacity determined in accordance with local character and presence of trees which may require retention.

WOH268 WTNA

Not allocated

Oxley Park Golf Club land adjacent to 1A Ribbesford Road, Wolverhampton

Housing

3

0.06 (B)

0.06

Na

By 2029

As for C33.

WOH269 WTNA

Not allocated

Oxley Park Golf Club land adjacent to 21 Oxley Links Road

Housing

3

0.14 (G)

0.14

Na

By 2029

As for C33.

WOH270 WTNA

Not allocated

Oxley Park Golf Club land adjacent to 10 Oxley Links Road

Housing

4

0.23 (G)

0.23

Na

By 2029

As for C33.

WOH267 WTNA

Not allocated

South Staffordshire Golf Course land at Codsall Road, Wolverhampton

Housing

8

0.85 (G)

0.40

20

By 2029

Site removed from green belt. The new green belt boundary will continue to follow the edge of South Staffordshire Golf Course. Mitigation for green belt loss to be provided through accessibility, biodiversity and environmental quality improvements to South Staffordshire Golf Course. Mature trees cover half of the site, reducing the net developable area. Adjoining housing is of very low density with large rear gardens and new development should reflect this open character and ribbon development with a net density of no more than 20 dph. Subject to reconfiguration of golf course to replace hole lost to development and retain high standard of South Staffordshire Golf Course as defined in current Playing Pitch evidence.

WOH265 WTNA

Not allocated

Land West of Perton Road, Wightwick

Housing

4

0.60 (G)

0.60

Na

By 2029

Site removed from green belt. Mitigation for green belt loss to be provided through accessibility, biodiversity and environmental quality improvements to nearby Smestow Valley Local Nature Reserve. Track to the north west, which runs along the Wolverhampton / South Staffs District boundary, is capable of providing a defensible new green belt boundary.

WOH274 WTNA

Not allocated

Former Wolverhampton Environment Centre (WEC), Westacre Crescent, Finchfield

Housing

14

0.83 (B)

0.45

31

By 2029

Previously developed site removed from green belt. Outline permission previously granted on site for 14 houses. Mitigation for green belt loss to be provided through 10 years maintenance funding for former WEC grounds, which are to be incorporated into the adjoining Smestow Valley Local Nature Reserve. .



Table 44 - Wolverhampton Gypsy and Traveller Pitch Allocations in Black Country Plan

BCP Site Ref / Location

 

 

Previous Local Plan Allocation (replaced unless stated)

Site Name and Address

Appropriate Uses

Indicative Development Capacity

(net homes)

Gross Site Area (ha) (Brownfield /Greenfield)

Indicative Net Developable Area (ha)

Net Density (dph)

Anticipated Delivery Timescale

Further Information

WOGT06

SRCRA

SRCAAP – HP5

Former Bushbury Reservoir, Showell Road, Wolverhampton

Gypsy and Traveller Pitches

12

2.42 (G)

0.30

40

By 2029

Subject to compensation for loss of SLINC value.

 

 

Table 45 - Wolverhampton Employment Allocations in Black Country Plan – Policy EMP1

BCP Site Ref / Location

Previous Local Plan Allocation (replaced unless stated)

Site Name and Address

Appropriate Uses

Indicative Development Capacity (ha employment land)

Gross Site area (ha)

Anticipated Delivery Timescale

Further Information

WOE684 SRCRA

SRCAAP EDO 2

Rear of IMI Marstons, Wobaston Road

Employment

7.2

7.2

By 2039

High quality design adjacent to canal.

WOE731 WCRA

Not allocated

Pantheon Park (former Prime 10, Bentley Bridge)

Employment

7.2

7.2

By 2029

 

WOE737 BCRA

BCAAP MU3

Bilston Urban Village

Employment

6.0

6.0

By 2029

 

WOE703 WCRA

BCAAP Recreational Open Space (not to be replaced)

Dean Road / Neachells Lane

Employment

8.0

8.0

By 2029

Part of larger Neachells Lane Open Space. Subject to mitigation for loss of open space and SLINC / nature conservation value. Capacity may be constrained by highways access onto Neachells Lane. Further assessment work is underway which will be reflected in the Publication Plan.

WOE618 WCRA

Not allocated

Tata Steel, Wednesfield

Employment

4.3

4.3

By 2034

 

WOE735 BCRA

BCAAP EDO 13

South of Citadel Junction, Bilston

Employment

3.2

3.2

By 2039

Subject to remediation and mitigation for loss of nature conservation value.

WOE723 SRCRA

SRCAAP EDO 10

Gas Holder site, Wolverhampton Science Park

Employment

2.6

2.6

By 2029

 

WOE732 WCRA

Not allocated

Bowmans Harbour, Wednesfield

Employment

2.6

2.6

By 2029

 

WOE662 BCRA

Not allocated

Former MEB site, Major Street / Dixon Street

Employment

2.5

2.5

By 2039

 

WOE681 SRCRA

SRCAAP EDO 14

Cross Street North / Crown Street

Employment

2.1

2.1

By 2039

High quality design adjacent to canal. Specific guidance in Wolverhampton Locks Conservation Area. Appraisal to be Incorporated into design and layout of site.

WOE755 BCRA

BCAAP EDO 8

Rolls Royce Playing Field, Spring Road

Employment

1.8

1.8

By 2039

Subject to compensation for loss of playing field / bowling green.

WOE725 SRCRA

SRCAAP EDO 4

Wolverhampton Business Park

Employment

1.8

1.8

By 2034

Existing commitment (includes Class E Office use)

WOE698 WCRA

Not allocated

Phoenix Road

Employment

1.8

1.8

By 2039

 

WOE757 BCRA

BCAAP EDO 1

Inverclyde Drive

Employment

1.4

1.4

By 2034

 

WOE753 BCRA

BCAAP EDO 12

Rear of Dale Street (Vulcan Road)

Employment

1.4

1.4

By 2034

 

WOE729 WCRA

Not allocated

Bentley Bridge Business Park, Well Lane

Employment

1.2

1.2

By 2029

 

WOE694 WCRA

Not allocated

Land behind Keyline Builders Merchants Limited, Neachells Lane / Noose Lane

Employment

1.2

1.2

By 2034

 

WOE756 BCRA

BCAAP EDO 5

Purbrook Road

Employment

0.9

0.9

By 2034

Subject to protecting and improving the environment along Willenhall Road in line with Bilston Corridor AAP Policy BC2.

WOE759 BCRA

BCAAP EDO 6

Powerhouse, Commercial Road

Employment

0.9

0.9

By 2039

 

WOE763 BCRA

Not allocated

Dale St, adjacent Debs Diner

Employment

0.9

0.9

By 2039

 

WOE727 SRCRA

SRCAAP EDO 12

Mammoth Drive, Wolverhampton Science Park

Employment

0.8

0.8

By 2034

 

WOE690 SRCRA

SRCAAP EDO 18

Shaw Road

Employment

0.8

0.8

By 2034

 

WOE758 SRCRA

Not allocated

Former Strykers, Bushbury Lane

Employment

0.8

0.8

By 2029

 

WOE658 BCRA

Not allocated

Millfields Road, Ettingshall

Employment

0.7

0.7

By 2039

 

WOE726 SRCRA

SRCAAP EDO 11

Stratosphere Site, Wolverhampton Science Park

Employment

0.7

0.7

By 2034

High quality design adjacent to canal. Specific guidance in Wolverhampton Locks Conservation Area Appraisal to be Incorporated into design and layout of Site.

WOE760 BCRA

BCAAP EDO 9

Rear of Spring Road

Employment

0.7

0.7

By 2039

 

WOE734 BCRA

BCAAP EDO 11

Springvale Avenue

Employment

0.7

0.7

By 2039

 

WOE754 BCRA

BCAAP EDO 4

Hickman Avenue

Employment

0.7

0.7

By 2039

Subject to protecting and improving the environment along Willenhall Road in line with Bilston Corridor AAP Policy BC2.

WOE761 BCRA

BCAAP EDO 2

Chillington Fields

Employment

0.6

0.6

By 2039

Subject to protecting and improving the environment along Willenhall Road in line with Bilston Corridor AAP Policy BC2.

WOE762 BCRA

BCAAP EDO 3

St Matthews Street

Employment

0.5

0.5

By 2039

 

 

 

Policies for Strategic Allocations

 

Policy CSA1 – Bushbury Strategic Allocation

Policy CSA1 – Bushbury Strategic Allocation

D.30 The Bushbury Strategic Allocation falls within the Bushbury Neighbourhood Growth Area and covers BCP Housing Allocations WOH257, WOH258, WOH259 and WHO260. These sites have been removed from the green belt and allocated to deliver 532 homes in total, at an average net density of 40 dph, together with sufficient space to provide a two-form entry primary school.

The estimated phasing of delivery is:

  • By 2029: 348 homes and primary school (if necessary)
  • 2029-34: 184 homes
    1. The sites are currently in two separate ownerships; however, they require an integrated and comprehensive approach to development because they are adjacent to each other and have joint infrastructure needs, in terms of:
  • school place impacts;
  • highways impacts;
  • delivery of mitigation for green belt loss ;
  • delivery of biodiversity net gain;
  • delivery of improvements to recreational open space
    1. The potential new primary school could also serve the needs of the Fallings Park Strategic Allocation (see Policy CSA2).
    2. The key planning requirements for the Bushbury Strategic Allocation are set out below. Other standard policy requirements, as set out in the BCP and Wolverhampton Local Plan documents and SPDs, will also apply. A masterplan will be prepared to guide comprehensive development of the Bushbury Strategic Allocation. This will provide further detail on the requirements set out in this Policy and will provide a spatial framework for developments.
       
School Place Requirements

D.34 Current pupil yield estimates from housing developments indicate that additional primary school places may be required to serve the Bushbury Neighbourhood Growth Area and other planned housing developments in the north east of Wolverhampton. Therefore, 2.3ha of Site WOH260 has been set aside for a potential primary school. If this site is not ultimately required for provision of a primary school, it will be brought forward for additional housing. In this event, improvements to increase accessibility to nearby primary schools may be required in accordance with Policy HOU2.

D.35 It is currently anticipated that secondary school place requirements arising from housing developments in the north east of Wolverhampton over the plan period will be capable of being accommodated in existing secondary schools and / or the potential provision of a new secondary school within Wolverhampton. Public transport improvements to increase accessibility to secondary schools may be required in accordance with Policy HOU2.
 

Highways Requirements

D.36 To avoid adverse impacts on the wider road network, improvements to highway junctions along the Northycote Lane / Legs Lane / Bushbury Lane route will be required. Part of Moseley Road will also need to be upgraded to provide access to Sites WOH258 and WOH259, which will need to be brought forward together. Details will be set out in the masterplan.
 

Green Belt Loss Mitigation Requirements

D.37 The following measures will together form sufficient mitigation for the loss of green belt at Sites WOH257, WOH258, WOH259 and WOH260:

a.  accessibility, biodiversity and environmental quality improvements to Northycote Farm Country Park, which falls within the green belt and is owned and managed by City of Wolverhampton Council;
b.  accessibility, biodiversity and environmental quality improvements to 10.4ha of land designated as the Northycote Farm Country Park Extension Area, which is currently in the control of the owner of Sites WOH257, WOH258 and WOH259. This area falls within the green belt and is a designated SINC, which is currently not accessible to the public. The area will be subject to sensitive improvements, opened up for public access and maintained in perpetuity as an extension to the existing Northycote Farm Country Park.

D.38 There will be a requirement for all green belt loss mitigation works and any necessary transfer of land ownership to be completed before substantial completion of development at sites WOH257, WOH258, WOH259 and WOH260.

D.39 The green belt boundary has been redrawn around the development sites to exclude them from it. In most cases there is an existing landscaped buffer or road that will provide a defensible new green belt boundary. However, the northern boundary of Site WOH259 abuts agricultural land in South Staffordshire. To provide a defensible new green belt boundary in this location, it is important to ensure that the design of development on the site incorporates a significant landscaped buffer along this northern boundary.

D.40 Developments should be designed to minimise potential harm to the integrity of remaining green belt areas and landscape character, as identified in the Black Country Green Belt Study and Black Country Landscape Sensitivity Assessment.
 

Nature Conservation and Net Biodiversity Gain Requirements

D.41 All existing SINCs, SLINCs, tree preservation orders, hedgerows, woodland and significant trees, both within and adjoining the development sites, should be retained, protected and incorporated sympathetically into the design of development (see Policy ENV4). Sufficient buffer zones should be provided at the edge of these habitat areas, particularly where there are mature trees and hedgerows, to allow them to thrive following development.

D.42 It is anticipated that biodiversity net gain requirements for the developments will be met through delivery of the green belt loss mitigation requirements set out above, and subject to the minimum 10% requirement identified in the Environment Bill / Act and the requirements of Policy ENV3.
 

Historic Environment Requirements

D.43 The design of developments should respect the existence of historic environment designations in areas to the north, east and south of the sites, specifically: Moseley Old Hall (National Trust); Northycote Farm Grade II Listed Building; Moseley Mill and Fishponds Area of High Historic Landscape Value; Moseley Court Bushbury Designed Landscape of High Historic Value; Moseley Historic Rural Settlement Area of High Historic Townscape Value and Bushbury Hill Conservation Area.
 

Recreational Open Space Requirements

D.44 Subject to satisfactory delivery of the green belt loss mitigation requirements set out above, it is judged that the local area will have good access to existing recreational open space, allotments and play and sports facilities that have the capacity to meet the varied needs of residents, in line with adopted open space standards. Therefore, no new on-site open space will be required, beyond that necessary to protect existing nature conservation value and to provide sufficient natural, sustainable drainage systems. However, it will be necessary to provide quality walking and cycle routes within the developments, which provide easy, quick and safe access to nearby open spaces and the countryside, and incorporate existing rights of way, including the existing footpath / cycleway track currently dividing the two parts of Site WOH257.
 

Sustainable Drainage Requirements

D.45 Naturalised sustainable drainage systems that are sufficient to retain greenfield runoff rates should be provided separately for each site, in accordance with Policy CC5. An allowance for the space necessary to accommodate these systems has been made when defining the indicative net developable area. This allowance may be adjusted when the masterplan is prepared.
 

Local Wastewater Treatment Capacity

D.46 The Black Country Water Cycle Study concludes that there is limited headroom / capacity at the Coven Heath wastewater treatment works serving the area. Severn Trent have identified this constraint and have indicated that they will be able to deliver the upgrades required to local wastewater treatment capacity in a timely manner to support the delivery of developments within Bushbury Neighbourhood Growth Area, and also other developments in the north of Wolverhampton and parts of South Staffordshire, over the Plan period.
 

Policy CSA2 – Fallings Park Strategic Allocation

Policy CSA2 – Fallings Park Strategic Allocation


D.47 The Fallings Park Strategic Allocation lies within the Fallings Park Neighbourhood Growth Area and covers BCP Housing Allocations WOH262, WOH263, WOH264 and WOH271. These sites have been removed from the green belt and allocated to deliver 303 homes in total together with a central area of high-quality recreational open space, including play facilities, on Site WOH262, to serve existing and new residents. The sites are suitable for an average density of 40 dph, with the exception of Site WOH271. Due to the linear shape of this site, the rural character of the local area and the need to create a defensible green belt boundary, a development of no more than 25 dph is appropriate.

D.48 The estimated phasing of delivery is:

  • By 2029: 200 homes and recreational open space
  • 2029-34: 103 homes

D.49 The sites are currently in four separate ownerships; however they require an integrated and comprehensive approach to development because they are adjacent to each other and have joint infrastructure needs, in terms of:

a) school place impacts;
b) highways impacts;
c) delivery of green belt loss mitigation;
d) delivery of biodiversity net gain;
e) delivery of recreational open space

D.50 The potential new primary school on the Bushbury Strategic Allocation could also serve the needs of the Fallings Park Strategic Allocation (see Policy CSA1 above).

D.51 The key planning requirements for the Fallings Park Strategic Allocation are set out below. Other standard policy requirements, as set out in the BCP and Wolverhampton Local Plan documents and SPDs, will also apply. A masterplan will be prepared to guide the comprehensive development of the Fallings Park Strategic Allocation. This will offer further detail on the requirements set out in this Policy and will also provide a spatial framework for developments.
 

School Place Requirements

D.52 Current pupil yield estimates from housing developments indicate that additional primary school places may be required to serve the Fallings Park Neighbourhood Growth Area and other housing developments over the plan period in the north east of Wolverhampton. Therefore, 2.3ha of Site WOH260 has been set aside for a potential primary school.

D.53 It is currently anticipated that secondary school place requirements arising from housing developments in the north east of Wolverhampton over the plan period will be capable of being accommodated in existing secondary schools and / or the potential provision of a new secondary school within Wolverhampton.
 

Highways Requirements

D.54 To avoid adverse impacts on the wider road network, major improvements will be required to Grassy Lane, Wood Hayes Road, the Grassy Lane \ Wood Hayes Road junction and the Wood Hayes Road \ Wood End Road signal-controlled junction. Development would also contribute towards increasing congestion on Cannock Road, which has been identified as a pinch point requiring medium term investment.

D.55 Therefore, major improvements along the routes of Cannock Road and Wood Hayes Road are likely to be required. Details will be set out in the masterplan.
 

Green Belt Loss Mitigation Requirements

D.56 Mitigation for the loss of green belt at Sites WOH262, WOH263, WOH264 and WOH271 will be provided through accessibility, biodiversity and environmental quality improvements to the significant areas of recreational open space located in the nearby Bushbury Hill area, which fall within the green belt and are owned and managed by City of Wolverhampton Council. These cover: Tennyson Road Neighbourhood Park; Bushbury Hill Amenity Area; and Sandy Lane Allotments.

D.57 There will be a requirement for all green belt loss mitigation works and any necessary transfer of land ownership to be completed before substantial completion of development at sites WOH262, WOH263, WOH264 and WOH271.

D.58 The green belt boundary has been redrawn around the development sites to exclude them and to align with the administrative boundary between Wolverhampton and South Staffordshire. To the north and east this lies along a culvert / brook and hedgerows and through agricultural fields. To provide a defensible new green belt boundary in this location, it is important that the design of development incorporates significant landscaped buffers, which will also enhance the nature conservation value of existing habitats.

D.59 Developments should be designed to minimise potential harm to the integrity of remaining green belt areas and landscape character, as identified in the Black Country Green Belt Study and Black Country Landscape Sensitivity Assessment.
 

Nature Conservation and Net Biodiversity Gain Requirements

D.60 All existing hedgerows, woodland and significant trees both within and adjoining the development sites should be retained, protected and incorporated sympathetically into the design of development (see Policy ENV4). Sufficient buffer areas should be provided at the edge of these habitat areas, particularly where mature trees and hedgerows exist, to allow them to thrive following development.

D.61 It is anticipated that biodiversity net gain requirements for the developments will be met on-site or through the green belt mitigation measures set out above, and subject to the minimum 10% requirement identified in the Environment Bill / Act and the requirements of Policy ENV3.
 

Recreational Open Space Requirements

D.62 1ha of recreational open space, including play facilities, will be provided on Site WOH262 to deliver a park to serve residents. Following this provision, the local area will benefit from good access to recreational open space, allotments, play and sports facilities that together have the capacity to meet the varied needs of residents, in line with adopted open space standards. No additional new on-site open space is likely to be required, beyond that necessary to protect existing nature conservation value and provide sufficient natural, sustainable drainage systems. However, it will be necessary to provide quality walking and cycle routes within the developments that provide easy, quick and safe access to nearby open spaces and the countryside, and which also incorporate existing rights of way.
 

Sustainable Drainage Requirements

D.63 Naturalised sustainable drainage systems that are sufficient to retain greenfield runoff rates should be provided in accordance with Policy CC5. Allowances for the space necessary to accommodate these systems, and a culvert standoff zone, have been made when defining the indicative net developable area. These allowances may be adjusted when the masterplan is prepared.
 

Local Wastewater Treatment Capacity

D.64 The Black Country Water Cycle Study concludes that there is limited headroom / capacity at the Coven Heath wastewater treatment works that serve this area. Severn Trent have identified this constraint and have indicated that they are able to deliver the upgrades required to local wastewater treatment capacity in a timely manner to support the delivery of developments within the Fallings Park Neighbourhood Growth Area, and also other developments in the north of Wolverhampton and parts of South Staffordshire, over the Plan period.

 

 

Waste Allocations

Strategic Waste Management Sites

D.65 The existing strategic sites identified on the Waste Key Diagram are the significant waste management facilities operating in the Black Country. They have been identified through a detailed analysis of all known licenced and exempt facilities in each authority's area. Under Policy W2: Waste Sites, the BCA will safeguard existing strategic and other waste management facilities from inappropriate development, to maintain existing levels of waste management capacity. The strategic waste management sites within Wolverhampton are listed in Table 50:
 

Table 46 - Wolverhampton Strategic Waste Management Sites (BCP Policy W2)

BCP Site Ref / Location

Previous Local Plan Ref (replaced unless stated)

Site Name and Address

Operational Capacity (tonnes per annum)

Municipal Waste Recovery - installations

WS03

SRCRA

SRCAAP – SW1

Wolverhampton Energy from Waste (EfW), Crown Street

115,000

Municipal Waste Recovery - Supporting Infrastructure

WS13

SRCRA

SRCAAP – SW2

Crown Street Recycling Transfer Station

20,000

WS14

BCRA

BCAAP – BC2 (1)

Anchor Lane Household Waste Recycling Centre (HWRC)

10,000

WS15

SRCRA

SRCAAP – SW3

Shaw Road Household Waste Recycling Centre (HWRC)

10,000

Other Significant Waste Management Infrastructure

WS57 BCRA

Not Allocated

Ettingshall Inert Waste Recycling Facility, Millfields Road

100,000

WS58 BCRA

Not Allocated

Neachells Lane WTS (SUEZ Recycling and Recovery UK Ltd)

25,000

WS59 BCRA

Not Allocated

JMP Wilcox & Company, Road, Beldray Road, Bilston

45,000

WS60 BCRA

BCAAP – BC2 (6)

Purbrook WTS (S.B. Waste Management & Recycling Ltd), Purbrook Road

25,000

Sources: Environment Agency: Waste Data Interrogator (WDI) 2007 – 2018, Operational Incinerators, 2018, Public Register, Remaining Landfill Capacity in England as at end of 2018 Version 2
 

Preferred Areas for New Waste Facilities

D.66 A number of employment areas have been identified in the Black Country Waste Study (BCWS) as being suited to the development of new waste recovery, waste treatment and waste transfer infrastructure. Under Policy W3: Preferred Areas for New Waste Facilities, these areas are considered to be the least likely locations to give rise to land use conflicts; in several cases, there is already co-location of existing waste facilities to which new sites would contribute. There are three such areas within Wolverhampton, and these are identified on the Waste Key Diagram and listed in Table 51:
 

Table 47 - Wolverhampton Preferred Areas for New Waste Facilities (BCP Policy W3)

BCP Site Ref / Location

Site Name and Address

Potentially suitable waste uses[16]

Area (hectares)

WPWo1

BCRA

Wolverhampton / Ettingshall Corridor (North)

The area west of the railway line is under pressure from non-employment uses / proximity to housing, however, proposals will be dealt with on a case by case basis.

The area to the east of the railway line is less threatened and should therefore be the focus for additional waste uses.

Energy from Waste

Treatment

In-vessel composting

Anaerobic digestion

Transfer

Recycling

88.5

WPWo2

BCRA

Wolverhampton / Ettingshall Corridor (South)

The area is under pressure from housing proposals with significant areas of interest to the north eastern and western boundaries.

The area to the east of the railway line is less threatened, nd should therefore be the focus for additional waste uses.

Energy from Waste

Treatment

In-vessel composting

Anaerobic digestion

Transfer

Recycling

74.5

WPWo3

BCRA

Dale Street, Loxdale, Bilston

Treatment

In-vessel composting

Anaerobic digestion

Transfer

Recycling

20.6

 

Minerals Allocations

D.67 The Black Country Minerals Study (BCMS, Tables 12.10 and 12.9) lists all known existing mineral sites and mineral infrastructure sites in the Black Country. Existing mineral sites within the Black Country include permitted mineral extraction sites, stockpiles, brick and tile works, and a pot clay factory. There are no existing mineral sites in Wolverhampton.

D.68 Existing Black Country mineral infrastructure sites include secondary / recycled aggregates production, rail-linked aggregates depots, coating plants, ready-mix (RMX) concrete batching plants, manufacture of concrete products, and dry silo mortar (DSM) plants.

D.69 Under Policy MIN2: Minerals Safeguarding Areas, the BCA will safeguard all existing mineral sites and mineral infrastructure sites from inappropriate development; this is considered necessary in order to retain existing capacity, thus helping to make the best use of and conserve the Black Country's finite mineral resources.

D.70 The locations of Black Country mineral sites and mineral infrastructure sites are identified on the Minerals Key Diagram, and those sites located within Wolverhampton are listed in Table 52:
 

Table 48 - Wolverhampton Mineral Infrastructure Sites (BCP Policy MIN2)

BCP Site Ref / Location

Previous Local Plan Ref (replaced unless stated)

Site Name

Address

Type

MIWo1

WCRA

Not Allocated

Aggregate Industries (Wolverhampton)

Manfield Road, Wolverhampton

Concrete batching plant

MIWo2

BCRA

Not Allocated

Britannia Onsite Concrete

Oxford Street/ Vulcan Road, Bilston

Concrete batching plant

MIWo3

BCRA

Not Allocated

CPI Mortars (Wolverhampton)

Springvale Industrial Estate, Springvale Avenue, Bilston

Dry silo mortar plant

MIWo4

WCRA

Not Allocated

Dismantling & Engineering Services

Noose Lane, Willenhall

Aggregates recycling

MIWo5

BCRA

BCAAP – BC2 (5)

Ettingshall Asphalt Plant

Spring Road, Wolverhampton,

Coating plant

MIWo6

BCRA

BCAAP – BC2 (5)

Ettingshall Recycling Facility

Millfields Road, Ettingshall

Aggregates recycling

MIWo7

BCRA

Not Allocated

G L Ready Mix Concrete

Unit 1a, Thomas Street, Blakenhall

Concrete batching plant

MIWo8

BCRA

Not Allocated

Hanson Ready Mix, Concrete (Wolverhampton)

Neachells Lane, Wednesfield

Concrete batching plant

MIWo9

WCRA

Not Allocated

Landywood Concrete Products Ltd

Neachells Lane, Wednesfield

Concrete batching plant

MIWo10

WCRA

Not Allocated

Neachells Lane Transfer Station

Consolidation House, Neachells Lane, Willenhall

Specialist facility for manufacture of concrete blocks from recovered street sweepings

MIWo11

BCRA

Not Allocated

Premier Mortars (Wolverhampton)

Chillington Works Industrial Estate, Cross Street, Eastfield

Dry silo mortar plant

MIWo12

BCRA

Not Allocated

S S Concrete

Price Street, Bilston

Concrete batching plant

MIWo13

BCRA

BCAAP – BC2 (5)

Tarmac Concrete Ettingshall

Millfields Road, Ettingshall

Concrete batching plant

 

 

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